Google introduces criteria for mobile-friendly sites

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On a mobile device, we prefer mobile sites. It just makes sense to view content in a correctly-formatted way to better the viewing experience. If not, everything is far too see and requires a lot of zooming and panning. To prevent any hassle, Google has introduced a criteria for mobile-friendly sites. First and foremost, sites welcoming visitors with mobile devices should not be using software like Flash that is no longer supported. Text and images throughout the site should be readable without the zooming and panning as mentioned before. And spacing should be used so that there are no mis-taps.

This is how Google recommends you make your site mobile-friendly:

Source: Official Google Webmaster Central Blog

Google acquires RelativeWave and makes the developer’s $80 app cost nothing

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RelativeWare, the developer behind the app Form, has been acquired by Google. The developer announced today that it is joining Google, but development of Form will continue. Never heard of Form? It is an app available in the Mac App Store that mirrors an iOS app’s design while being worked on simultaneously. To celebrate, Form’s original $80 price has been kicked to the curb and it is now free.

Here is what RelativeWare had to say of the acquisition:

Today, with the help of Google, we’re making Form free on the Mac App Store. We want to get Form in the hands of as many people as possible, and this is our first step in accomplishing that goal.

We’ve just scratched the surface with prototyping. With the help of Google, we’ll be focused on improving the state of design and development tools.

Customers that purchased Form already are eligible for a refund. RelativeWare directs customers to the support email to take care of that. And when asked if the Form viewer would make its way to other platforms, the developer said “Stay tuned.” It looks like nothing but good things are ahead for RelativeWare.

Source: RelativeWave

Nexus 7 (2012) owners are feeling like their tablet is ‘unusable’ after the Lollipop update

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The anticipation of receiving (or manually installing) a new Android update is mind blowing. Not only can’t you wait to see the new interface, but your also hoping the performance will dramatically improve. Unfortunately that’s not the case for a lot of Nexus 7 (2012) owners.

Many users are reporting that their tablet has become so slow and buggy with restarts that it’s “unusable.” One of the Google product experts suggested clearing the recovery cache partition, but unfortunately that hasn’t helped.


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Android One phones to get Lollipop by the end of January

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Android One smartphones might be off to a slow start in terms of sales, but it also appears they are also off to a slow start in terms of updates. According to one of the manufacturers, Spice Mobility, the Dream Uno will receive the Lollipop update by the end of January 2015. More than likely, the Micromax A1 and the Karbonn Sparkle V will also get the update around the same time.

Since all Android One phones sport hardware specified by Google and updates come directly from them, you would think the update would be a little quicker. According to sources within Google, the update is ready, so it’s possible that it could start rolling in December. I guess only time will tell.

source: India Today

Naked Tough Case for Nexus 6 available through Google Play

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People are starting to receive the Nexus 6 in the mail and in-store through select carriers. Among the first things to do with a new device is purchasing accessories. And the go-to accessory for almost everyone is a case. Directly from Google, the Naked Tough Case is ready for ordering. It is a clear case that offers protection and functionality. On the back is an integrated stand that pops out for landscape viewing.

The Naked Tough Case for Nexus 6 costs $35 and will ship in 1-2 business days.

Source: Google Play

Google adds Nexus 9 factory image for LRX21R update

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The Nexus 9 is getting another update (LRX21R), which should clean up some bugs. As usual, it will take at least a week to hit all devices, so the impatient types can download and install the factory image, which Google posted earlier today.

If you need help flashing it, you can check out our full instructions here. Alternatively, you can opt to manually install the over-the-air (OTA) update, which will keep your data, assuming your Nexus 9 isn’t unlocked. Click here for those very extensive instructions.

source: Google Factory Images

Google releases Android Auto APIs for developers

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Earlier this year, Google announced Android Auto (a version of Android designed to bring the Android platform into cars), and today the search engine giant has granted developers access to its APIs for this service. According to the company, this will enable mobile apps to “be extended to the car in a way that is optimized for the driving experience.”


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Google working on image recognition that can describe scenes and objects

google image recognitionGoogle is cconstantly working on improving their image search and recognition algorithms, and the latest research shows some really impressive results. Thanks to some recent advances in translation technology, Google’s image recognition can actually see a photo and describe what’s going on in the picture, like you can see above.

Not only is the algorithm able to recognize individual objects, but it can describe scenes and phrases. This could potentially help users to search for images based on a very specific phrase, or on the opposite end, help users see understand a picture when they can’t see the image, like when a slow data connection can’t manage it.
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Google encourages developers to use the newer Saved Games feature (Snapshots) instead of AppState

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Back in 2013, Google Play Games launched giving developers the ability to implement game saves using the AppState API. The API made it easier for developers in that they didn’t need their own server for the saves. However, it was limited to only 4 slots of 256k of data, which wasn’t enough for some games.

Google followed up with a new Saved Games feature that used Google Drive and gave developers 3 MB per game and unlimited slots. This was introduced a few months ago at Google I/O, but the older AppState continued to exist.


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