Kirby Ferguson On Music, Apple And Android: “Everything Is A Remix”

by Roy Alugbue on
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In the spirit of the recent jury verdict in favor of Apple… and the subsequent follow-up opinions regarding the matter, it’s only fitting that we hear other individuals give their two cents regarding the idea of patents and true innovation. In the TEDTalks (Technology, Entertainment and Design Talks) video podcast, Everything Is A Remix founder Kirby Ferguson offers some perspective on the idea of true innovation. He believes music is evolved by copying and transforming melodies, combining them with new lyrics or more specifically, transforming old lyrics with an artists’ perspective and spin. He cites famed folk/pop singer Bob Dylan who used works from other singers such as Paul Clayton. More importantly, Ferguson highlights that two-thirds of Dylan’s earlier melodies in his music are “borrowed”. You’d imagine that artists would have a hard time accepting their work is “borrowed” by other artists, but not-so-fast— it isn’t the case. Here’s another famed artist Woodie Guthrie offering his perspective on items like lyrics and melodies in borrowed music:

 

“The words aren’t the important thing. Don’t worry about tunes. Take a tune, sing high when they sing low, sing fast when they sing slow, and you’ve got a new tune”.

 

So with that concept in mind, Ferguson uses additional time to criticize Apple for not applying the “everything is borrowed” perspective for its products. He highlights the hypocrisy of American and international copyright and patent laws are built to counter the ability to previously use the work of others. Moreover, he cites multi-touch that was introduced in the original iPhone as an example. While Apple did indeed “patent” the technology, Ferguson highlights an example of the technology used by Jeff Han one year earlier and even highlighted the technology “wasn’t completely new” when he put it on display at a conference. This is fitting because Steve Jobs even admits in 1996 that even Apple “steals ideas”— with multi-touch being the most famed example… except it’s acceptable for Apple because you know— Android is a stolen product and all.

The video podcast is certainly an interesting one, so be sure to hit the break in order to check it out in all its entirety.

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Samsung confident in its appeal, prepares for multiple scenarios

by Colton Kaiser on
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We already knew that Samsung would be filing post-verdict motions to overturn the jury’s guilty verdict, but it’s unclear as to exactly what path the company will take. Samsung’s official statement solidified its stance on fighting the issue, saying “this isn’t the final word in this case or in battles being waged in courts and tribunals around the world, some of which have already rejected many of Apple’s claims.” And, with $1.05 billion at stake, it makes sense for the South Korean-based electronics company to carefully prepare before it takes its next step.

It’s expected that Samsung’s appeal to Judge Lucy Koh will be centered around the argument that the jury’s verdict was either unreasonable or unsupported by the evidence in play. Very rarely do Judges grant these types of motions, but due to the amount of damages, Samsung feels it has a chance. However, if the company is unsuccessful, there may be a slew of other options.

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A juror from the Samsung vs Apple case speaks out and details the deliberation process

by Macky Evangelista on
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I don’t know about you, but I’m still profoundly shocked and whip-lashed from the outcome of the Samsung vs. Apple patent lawsuit.  While the jury was still in deliberations deciding on the outcome of this case, I always thought to myself what I’d give to have an ear in that room with the 9 jurors. I’m sure many of you can share the same sentiments as we would all love to know what went down in there  that ultimately cost Samsung more than a billion dollars. Thankfully, one of those 9 jury members by the name of Manuel Ilagan has stepped forward and provided all of us with some insight on what was talked about and why they gave Apple this landslide victory.

According to Ilagan, “We found for Apple because of the evidence they presented. It was clear there was infringement.” That statement alone pretty  much tells us that Samsung had no chance in this battle right off the bat. Ilagan also provided what he, and the other jurors, thought were damning evidence against Samsung:

“Well, there were several. The e-mails that went back and forth from Samsung execs about the Apple features that they should incorporate into their devices was pretty damning to me. And also, on the last day, they showed the pictures of the phones that Samsung made before the iPhone came out and ones that they made after the iPhone came out. Some of the Samsung executives they presented on video [testimony] from Korea — I thought they were dodging the questions. They didn’t answer one of them. They didn’t help their cause.”

Ilagan also pointed out that a licencing deal that Samsung had with Intel piled on even more votes towards Apple:

“Samsung’s offensive on Apple that claimed Apple violated two of its patents relating to 3G wireless technology. One patent involved the baseband chip in the iPhone and iPad with 3G. During the trial, Apple turned around and pointed to a licensing deal Samsung had with Intel, which made the chips Apple used. Under that deal, Apple said, Samsung was not able to sue any companies Intel sold to. Apple then presented the receipts from when it purchased the accused chips from Intel.”

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ASUS Transformer Pad TF700KL Heading to Germany On Vodafone’s LTE Network

by Dominick DeVito on
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A press release from Vodafone has confirmed the ASUS Transformer Pad TF700KL is heading to Germany, a Transformer Pad TF700 with 4G LTE connectivity. The new LTE Transformer will initially launch in Germany, but will soon be available in other Vodafone stores across Europe – with the exception of Italy, which has not yet upgraded their network infrastructure to support LTE.

Unlike its Transformer TF700 siblings the TF700KL will be powered by a more power efficient dual-core Snapdragon S4 processor clocked at 1.5GHz (rather than the quad-core 1.6GHz Nvidia Tegra 3), which was most likely chosen due to LTE’s demanding battery life. Its display will be covered in Corning’s Gorilla Glass 2 which will allow the device to be thinner, but will still support a dazzling full 1920 x 1080 HD resolution. Other specs remain identical such as 1GB RAM, storage options of 16GB, 32GB or 64G, and as always an expandable microSD card slot.

The top-of-the-line TF700KL 64GB model will be priced at a hefty €819 ($1025 USD) for non subsidized customers and €169 ($211 USD) with a contract.

Source: Engadget
via: Notebook Italia

Apple wins, consumers lose, and the USPTO should be ashamed

by Robert Nazarian on
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I’m not sure I can say that I’m shocked at yesterday’s verdict, but I can say I’m thoroughly outraged. Anyone reading this knows I’m on the Android side of the fence, but that has nothing to do with it. I’ve already stated that if things were reversed, I wouldn’t want to see Samsung win either. I know readers probably won’t believe that, but it’s true. Yes, I want Android to always be the leader, but never at the expense of innovation.

Now with that said, the jury isn’t at fault here. The verdict was correct based on the patents that Apple owns, and there’s no question that Samsung was guilty of infringing on them. In fact Samsung never had a chance to win this case, so I’m not sure why they invested so much trying to fight it. The problem is the patents themselves and the patent system as a whole. Samsung argued that Apple’s patents we are all based on previous innovations and therefore weren’t valid, but it was unlikely the jury would overturn what the United States Patent and Trademark Office already issued. Assuming that’s the case, the jury had no choice but to find that Samsung did in fact infringe on the patents. If anyone is guilty of any wrong-doing it’s the USPTO for issuing the patents in the first place.

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Samsung and Apple respond to jury’s decision, injunction hearing set for September 20th

by Colton Kaiser on
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With the jury’s official verdict of $1 billion already known, lawyers have shifted their focus to the aftermath. Both companies have issued official statements regarding today’s court ruling. Apple is claiming satisfaction with the jury’s decision, supporting the idea of original design and innovation. The Cupertino-based company hopes its statement sends “a loud and clear message that stealing isn’t right.” On the other side of things, Samsung fears the verdict hurts consumers, leaving them with “fewer choices, less innovation, and potentially higher prices.” 

Now that the trial is over, Apple is seeking a preliminary injunction on Samsung’s infringing products. The initial hearing is slated for September 20th, though Apple will have until the 29th to file the motion, giving Samsung 14 days to respond. As expected, it’s been confirmed that Samsung will be appealing today’s ruling, but in the meantime you can read official statements from both companies after the break.

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ITC rules Apple did not violate Motorola wifi patent, case headed back to courtroom

by Jeff Causey on
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Folks in Cupertino and Apple fans around the world are surely in a good mood going into this weekend with the recently announced results of the Apple v Samsung trial in which Apple has prevailed (at least for now). More good news for Apple came out of the ITC today in determining that Apple had not violated a Motorola patent on some wifi technology. The ITC commission also exonerated Apple with regard to two other patents.

An ITC judge had originally ruled in Motorola’s favor and Apple was facing a ban of their devices had the commission’s review not gone in their favor. The possibility of a ban still exists as the case has been sent back to the original judge for a new review regarding the possibility that Apple violated a non-standards-based patent. This will effectively “reset” the case, so it will likely drag on for at least another year. In the meantime, Motorola has started a new action against Apple alleging more patent violations.

source: Engadget

The Ruling Is In: Jury Rules In Favor Of Apple Over Samsung In Landmark Case, Samsung Ordered To Pay Over $1 Billion In Damages

by Roy Alugbue on
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The verdict is officially in folks— Apple has officially claimed victory over Samsung. Based off extensive review and hours of deliberation, the jury believes Samsung not only violated numerous Apple patents, but also Apple has not infringed on any of Samsung’s patents. Here’s a quick rundown of each verdict:

 

  • Jury finds Samsung infringement of Apple utility, design patents for some (though not all) products
  • Jury upholds Apple utility, design patents
  • Jury upholds Apple trade dress ’983
  • Jury finds Samsung “diluted” Apple’s registered iPhone, iPhone 3 and “Combination iPhone” trade dress on some products, not on others
  • No Apple infringement of Samsung utility patents
  • Jury found Samsung violated antitrust law by monopolizing markets related to the UMTS standard

 

As a result of the jury’s decision, Samsung is also ordered to pay a king’s ransom in damages— all to the tune of $1.05 billion, while no damages are assessed to Apple in Samsung’s countersuit.

Thoughts?

source: CNet Live Blog
via: CNet

Amazon adds hundreds of award-winning TV episodes to Amazon Prime Instant Video through NBC agreement

by Sean Stewart on
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With the Nexus 7 hot on its heels, the Kindle Fire will need every advantage it can get. Amazon announced today that they will add hundreds of popular TV episodes for Kindle Fire owners through an expanded Prime Instant Video agreement with NBCUniversal Cable & New Media Distribution. Included in the expanded video content are episodes from shows like Friday Night Lights (YES!), Parks and Recreation, Heroes, and Battlestar Galactica. This could prove to be a nice shot in the arm for the Kindle Fire. Hit the break for the full press release from Amazon: » Read the rest