Adobe To Stop Development Of Flash For Mobile Browsers

Before you pull your hair out just yet, Flash isn’t going away, it’s just not going to be developed further. While Adobe has made it official that they are stopping development of Flash for mobile browsers, they also made it clear there will be continued bug fixes and security updates for existing devices. Adobe’s statement reads:

Our future work with Flash on mobile devices will be focused on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores.  We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook.  We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations.  We will also allow our source code licensees to continue working on and release their own implementations.

Adobe’s reasoning for this is to put more resources into HTML5. What I gather from all of this is, though Flash in its current state will not be seen on future devices, we can expect to see something even better on the horizon with HTML5. I’m not sure this is anything to freak out about, but more to be excited about the cool new things HTML5 will bring to both PC and mobile devices. I’m curious to hear what you all think though. Hit up the break to check out the full press release for yourself and let us know what you think.

Adobe is all about enabling designers and developers to create the most expressive content possible, regardless of platform or technology. For more than a decade, Flash has enabled the richest content to be created and deployed on the web by reaching beyond what browsers could do. It has repeatedly served as a blueprint for standardizing new technologies in HTML.  Over the past two years, we’ve delivered Flash Player for mobile browsers and brought the full expressiveness of the web to many mobile devices.

However, HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively.  This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms. We are excited about this, and will continue our work with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM, to drive HTML5 innovation they can use to advance their mobile browsers.

Our future work with Flash on mobile devices will be focused on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores.  We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook.  We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations.  We will also allow our source code licensees to continue working on and release their own implementations.

These changes will allow us to increase investment in HTML5 and innovate with Flash where it can have most impact for the industry, including advanced gaming andpremium video.  Flash Player 11 for PC browsers just introduced dozens of new features, including hardware accelerated 3D graphics for console-quality gaming and premium HD video with content protection.  Flash developers can take advantage of these features, and all that our Flash tooling has to offer, to reach more than a billion PCs through their browsers and to package native apps with AIR that run on hundreds of millions of mobile devices through all the popular app stores, including the iTunes App Store, Android Market, Amazon Appstore for Android and BlackBerry App World.

We are already working on Flash Player 12 and a new round of exciting features which we expect to again advance what is possible for delivering high definition entertainment experiences.  We will continue to leverage our experience with Flash to accelerate our work with the W3C and WebKit to bring similar capabilities to HTML5 as quickly as possible, just as we have done with CSS Shaders.  And, we will design new features in Flash for a smooth transition to HTML5 as the standards evolve so developers can confidently invest knowing their skills will continue to be leveraged.

We are super excited about the next generations of HTML5 and Flash.  Together they offer developers and content publishers great options for delivering compelling web and application experiences across PCs and devices.  There is already amazing work being done that is pushing the newest boundaries, and we can’t wait to see what is still yet to come!

[via adobe]


About the Author: Harold Williams

Harold was born and raised in Whitehall, NY (supposedly the birthplace of the US Navy). His first real smartphone experience belonged to Nokia and Symbian. Following came years of being a happy BlackBerry follower with a brief moment on Windows Mobile. Once a Droid X landed in his hands, he was forever converted to the dark side of the force. Memories of a Star Tac filled his head with happiness and once again joining Motorola in a new revolution. When not playing guitar he's following the tech world via Twitter and the mobile web trying to fill his need to have and know about the latest and greatest tech. Being grateful for all the free tools Google has provided, he is now sold on Google for life. In the real world he is filling his dorky needs as a project manager for a medical technology company.


  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Arvydas-Grušeckas/1802491461 Arvydas Grušeckas

    Droid fans should stop sayin’ that iOS and WP7 is crap, because it doesn’t have flash :D HTML5 is the future and WP7 has a very good browser for that

  • wikiwiki

    Flash is dead, Jobs was right… wow I didn’t see this one coming.

  • Nick C

    Jobs called it… it’s alright though, Flash was a badly coded, laggy, glitchy, mess on mobile and it’s a badly coded, CPU-hogging affair on the PC and Mac as well…

    Good riddance… I won’t miss it on my Droid X and I never missed it on my 4S

  • http://roderickbarnes.com/blog Roderick L. Barnes, Sr.

    I am sorry to see Flash go. However, it was doomed from the moment Adobe catering to every platform. The demand for maintenance had to be a nightmare for the fine folks at Adobe.

    As far as the code being buggy or laggy… it is vogue to say such things. Unless you have actually seen the ActionScript and C++ source code your comments are little more than gossip or slander.

    Jobs, you said it.

  • gilwet

    ? Nao entra como dificil
    Gilwet