Uh oh: Netflix has been throttling Verizon and AT&T video behind the scenes

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The debate about T-Mobile’s Binge On, net neutrality, and data caps only gets more exciting as time goes in, especially now that Netflix has admitted that they’ve been throttling video streams to customers on Verizon and AT&T’s network. It’s been doing this for the past five years to save data for customers, since both of those carriers have heavy-handed data caps.

It’s really not so bad that Netflix was doing this, but it is pretty unfortunate that they hid the fact from everyone. On the other hand, Netflix is trying to be a little more transparent by rolling out a data saving feature later this year that will let users toggle high quality streams on and off.

Note that this only affects Verizon and AT&T, not T-Mobile or Sprint. (Well, kind of. T-Mobile throttles you, anyway.) Netflix says this is because those carriers offer more consumer-friendly data options, which just means they offer unlimited data while Big Red and Ma Bell slap their customers with overage charges at exorbitant rates. However, Netflix didn’t account for the unlimited data users hanging onto old plans on Verizon and AT&T, and needless to say, that’s not going to make some people very happy.

And in case you were wondering, yes, John Legere jumped on Twitter to take shots at Verizon and AT&T over this. He still thinks 480p is an acceptable experience when watching movies on a 1080p screen, and I still think someone needs to let this man borrow their glasses and see a 1080p video stream, but at least he’s not going to let a controversy like this go down without making plenty of noise.

Have any of you noticed your Netflix streams have been a little fuzzy in the past few years?

source: Wall Street Journal

via: Cnet


About the Author: Jared Peters

Born in southern Alabama, Jared spends his working time selling phones and his spare time writing about them. The Android enthusiasm started with the original Motorola Droid and an unhealthy obsession with fixing things that aren't broken. This accidentally led to being the go-to guy for anything more complicated than a toaster, which he considers more of a curse than a blessing. Jared is enrolled in online classes at the University of Phoenix, and spends his spare time on video games and listening to music.