Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S3 and Galaxy Book keep the S Pen alive

We were all expecting some new tablets from Samsung at MWC, but I don’t think anyone expected them to give us several spiritual successors to the old Galaxy Note tablets. We have the Galaxy Tab S3 and the Galaxy Book, a 2-in-1 Windows tablet that comes in two flavors. And yes, it has S Pen support, too.

The Galaxy Tab S3 looks very, very similar to last year’s Galaxy Tab S2, but only comes in a 9.7-inch version. It’s a fairly boring upgrade in the hardware department (Snapdragon 820, 4GB of RAM, 6,000mAh battery) but the S Pen support adds some excitement. It has all the features that we saw in the Galaxy Note 7 in its brief time on the market, so this will give users an option to get that functionality without waiting for another Note.

The high-resolution screen also supports HDR content, and while there isn’t much of that available yet, I can imagine any HDR video will look phenomenal on Samsung’s already fantastic screens.

The Galaxy Book branches a little bit, offering a 10-inch and 12-inch model. The smaller version does not support HDR content and only has a 1080p LCD screen as opposed to the HDR-capable SAMOLED 12-inch variant, and has a few downgrades in other technical specs.

The smaller Galaxy Book sports an m3 Intel Dual Core processor with 4GB of RAM and either 64GB or 128GB of internal storage. There’s a 5-megxapixel front-facing camera and a single USB Type-C port, plus a microSD card slot.The larger, 12-inch Galaxy Book uses an Intel Core i5 CPU (serious power difference there) and comes in either 4GB/128GB or 8GB/256GB flavors, and it uses an SSD instead of eMMC storage.

The larger, 12-inch Galaxy Book uses an Intel Core i5 CPU (serious power difference there) and comes in either 4GB/128GB or 8GB/256GB flavors, and it uses an SSD instead of eMMC storage. There’s a 13-megapixel rear camera plus the 5-megapixel front shooter, and two USB Type-C ports alongside the expandable storage.

All of the tablets support Samsung’s software enhancements like the S Pen functions and Samsung Flow, which allows your Windows computer to talk to your smartphone to answer notifications and share files.

Samsung hasn’t announced pricing for anything yet, but I’d guess the Galaxy Tab S3 will land between $400 and $500. The Galaxy Book will almost definitely be much more expensive, considering the higher end Galaxy Books are fully functional Windows laptops. I’d guess a starting price of around $900 that probably caps a couple hundred shy of $2k, but we’ll have to wait for Samsung to make anything official.

Click here for our MWC 2017 coverage


About the Author: Jared Peters

Born in southern Alabama, Jared spends his working time selling phones and his spare time writing about them. The Android enthusiasm started with the original Motorola Droid and an unhealthy obsession with fixing things that aren't broken. This accidentally led to being the go-to guy for anything more complicated than a toaster, which he considers more of a curse than a blessing. Jared is enrolled in online classes at the University of Phoenix, and spends his spare time on video games and listening to music.