Toyota Connecting Car with a Nexus 7 Dock

Toyota_Intelligence_System_ConnectedNexus7Connected cars have been on everyone’s minds of late, but one problem keeps arising when considering merging mobile tech with your vehicle: upgrading. You may get a new tablet or phone every year or so, but a car? Maybe once or twice a decade. However, fear not, for Unimax has an answer.

Unimax, a subsidiary of Asus has teamed up with Toyota to create the Toyota Intelligent System (TIS). Using a Nexus 7 2013 mounted on the dashoard loaded with specific software, the TIS has everything you need to navigate. The navigation system connects to 4G and offers multimedia control, cloud computing, and voice recognition. Traffic reports, emergency services, Google maps, voice search, calendar, and more will be right at your fingertips. For added convenience, you can point at a location on the tablet and be directed there. On top of all of these features, the dock also wirelessly charges your tablet and pairs up with it using NFC for seamless connection.

The best thing about this project is its future-proofing. The Nexus 7 2013  just passed its first birthday recently, and while that’s hardly ancient in the world of vehicles and humans, it makes the Nexus 7 old news. With the next Nexus tablet’s release rapidly approaching, the fact that replacing the tablet with a new one with the same software is what will keep this idea alive.

As of right now, Toyota has not announced which models will feature TIS or if it will even be available in the U.S., but if you’re hoping your next Camry or Prius comes with a fresh dose of the future, leave a comment below and let us know!

Source: Mobile Geeks


About the Author: Alex Cobb

Alex is a student at Appalachian State University majoring in Computer Science. When he's not coding or tinkering with his tech devices, he enjoys exercise and playing music. He is currently trying to start many different businesses in hopes of making it big as an entrepreneur, from fixing and selling phones to crafting herbal teas. Alex's first smartphone was a Droid Bionic, and he's been rapidly jumping from device to device through the years. He also has a Nexus 7 (2012) as his small tablet of choice. Alex considers himself an avid Android Evangelist, converting Apple users to the superior operating system whenever he gets the chance.


  • Dick

    I would like to see this on my Prius.

  • j00py

    I don’t see how this addresses any issues with changing form factors. Most devices, including the Nexus line, change form factor at least slightly from generation to generation. How do they intend to compensate for this?

    • http://evildevnull.com/thinktank/index.php?action=collapse;c=14;sa=collapse;d227fb2388ec=9e8bb86861f0686e54bcbaae99929bbd#c14 George Leon

      How do universal mounts do it? That’s how. Connections are all wireless, so aside from needing BT, what else is there? Wireless charging? Optional. NFC? Again optional. Form factor itself is irrelevant as I am sure they will incorporate a design that is either modular in nature, or universal.

  • Lawrence Milford

    This is the way to go! Stop trying to install some substandard factory device and let us bring our own! We can update when we want to and take it with us when we need to.