Court Rules No Similarity, Use or Function Between Hasbro and Asus’s Products

In what seems like a never ending onslaught of legal battle after legal battle for the mobile industry, a recent court ruling regarding the lawsuit between Hasbro and Asus has been finalized.  Hasbro has pushed for a ban on Transformer Prime tablet sales due to what it states could cause confusion for customers who may mistake the tablet to be a Hasbro product.  The company used existing merchandise and noted the fact that Asus’s logo has been plastered on quite a number of other items such as USB drives and other related computer hardware.  In a statement from the ruling judge, it seems like the argument was anything but convincing:

“There is nothing gimmicky about the Eee Pad Transformer or the Eee Pad Transformer Prime, nor can it be said that there is any similarity in the use or function between Hasbro and Asus’s products.”

The judge took it one step further to state how he thought it actually strengthened Asus’s argument in that using the word Transformer couldn’t have been a more accurate description, as it obviously “transforms” into a laptop computer once docked into the qwerty keyboard.  In addition to the debacle, Asus revealed stats on the sales as far as pre-orders and actual fulfillment goes.

“…as of February 24, 2012, it had received over 2,000 pre-orders … and that retailer fulfillment orders for the next two months total approximately 80,000 tablet computers.”

source: paidContent

 

 

 


About the Author: Joe Sirianni

Joe was born in New Jersey and spent most of his childhood moving around from state to state. He eventually made his way to Pennsylvania where he met his Portuguese beauty and made her his wife. He now has three great kids and full access to all of the Portuguese food he can eat. Joe's love for mobile technology began when he bought his first Palm Pilot, a Palm M130 and left it on top of his car, driving off, causing it to smash into a thousand pieces. Forced to buy a new device, he quickly discovered that specs were changing so rapidly he was buying a new device every six months just to keep up. Since then, he has constantly felt the need to have the latest and greatest. When the "smartphone" revolution began and integrating cell phones and PDA's was the norm, he quickly jumped to Windows Mobile for several years until the first Android device was launched, the T-Mobile G1. Joe began appreciating all of the free utilities Google provided and sold his soul (his precious data) to Google long before they got into the mobile OS business. So, there was no hesitation at all for him to jump on board and ride the Android train as an early adopter. And boy has it been a blast. Joe now works in the Engineering & Operations dept for a major mobile carrier where he remotely troubleshoots cell sites and loves being an Editor for TalkAndroid.