The White House joins Snapchat as Obama prepares for final SOTU

white_house_snapcode_whitehouse

Tomorrow night, President Barack Obama will speak to everyone in the United States for what is going to be his final State of the Union address. It will apparently be a departure from traditional State of the Union addresses that see Congress pressed for decisions on a mountain of subjects; Denis McDonough, the White House Chief of Staff, spoke on various Sunday morning television shows to say that Obama will be talking about himself and the lives Americans can now live. But since we’re not in the business of covering politics, this post will stay in the realm of technology. So I’m here to tell you that you can go behind the scenes of the State of the Union address by adding the White House as a friend on Snapchat.

Read more

Google Play Music’s search bar finally blends in

google_play_music_layout_TA

Finally, Google has tweaked Play Music’s search bar to blend in with all of its other apps. The search bar’s new look, which does not require an update, is entirely white when activated and adds a dropdown animation with search history. Post-search results swoop in with Material Design-inspired animations, too.

And don’t worry, Google hasn’t removed the quick Identify what’s playing option.

Read more

Google wants to stream the NFL’s London games, Apple does too

NFL_logo

The National Football League (NFL) sends teams overseas annually to play games in London as a way to generate international interest in the sport and give false hope to locals that an organization would actually be located outside of the United States. During the current 2015 season, only one of the games was streamed online for everyone in the world to see. Now, after seeing modest results, the league wants to push heavier into streaming those London games. The NFL is shopping around all three games rather than just one, and two of the top interested parties are the tech industry’s fiercest rivals.

Google and Apple are fighting to secure rights to stream three NFL games.

Read more

Google’s footprint in home entertainment continues to grow with Android TV and Google Cast

android_tv_screen_02

A few years ago, Google started working on an entry into the home entertainment market that eventually became Android TV. There are good odds that this began as a response to Apple and their Apple TV devices. Along the way a couple developments took place that shook the market – Google introduced the Chromecast device and content providers like Netflix or Vudu discovered they could be more successful by making their apps available on any and all platforms instead of trying to secure exclusivity deals. Now, about 88% of electronic devices purchased by consumers in 2015 were Internet-enabled. These developments put Google in a good position to capitalize on consumers’ desire for easy access to content and platforms to watch movies or listen to music. The Android team at Google announced today that they are ready for more success with the addition of several new manufacturers who will be incorporating Android TV and Google Cast technology into their products. Read more