Sundar Pichai responds to Tim Cook’s comments regarding Android’s security and user turnover

by Justin Herrick on
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Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, and a ton of other people at Apple have typically never had anything nice to say about Android. That’s not to say Android’s leaders have never fired back, but Apple’s crew does not seem to do actually look at the facts. At WWDC a few weeks ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook decided to talk about Android. He rallied his crowd by bringing up Android’s security flaws and called it a “toxic hell stew.” Android and Chrome’s leader, Sundar Pichai, sat down with Businessweek to make some clarifications and issue a response. » Read the rest

Tim Cook calls out Google on Motorola and Android’s “crappy” tablet experience

by Justin Herrick on
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Apple CEO Tim Cook typically has nothing nice to say about Android. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Apple’s head honcho gave his opinion on Google letting go of Motorola. He calls the deal “a logical transaction” because Google was not “committed to” doing anything with Motorola. Cook then said “it’s really hard to do hardware, software and services” as a single company; however, he claims this is “what makes Apple so special.” Cook fails to mention products like the Chromebook Pixel or Google Chromecast. And I’m quite sure Google has a decent amount of influence on the design of Nexus devices.

Then came the harshest of Cook’s comments. On the subject of the Android experience on tablets, Cook feels it “is so crappy because the app is nothing more than a stretched out smartphone app.” Had Tim Cook said this a few years ago, he would be right. But now with devices like the Nexus 7 (2013) becoming more mainstream and accessible, developers have definitely noticed Android tablets.

So there you have it. Tim Cook throwing some more fire at Google and Android. But hey, everyone is entitled to their own opinions.

Source: The Wall Street Journal Digits

Tim Cook takes shots at Android fragmentation (again) in magazine interview

by Jared Peters on
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If there’s one thing Apple likes to jab Android for, it’s fragmentation. If you keep up with Android very well, you probably know that while Android does suffer from fragmentation, it’s not nearly as big of an issue as Steve Jobs and now Tim Cook make it out to be. There are devices that get abandoned on older versions of Android before their time, and there are some security issues that pop now and again, but security issues do receive patches outside of the operating system, thanks to some crafty Google Play services updates.

Tim Cook still apparently doesn’t agree, though. In his latest interview in Business Week, he took some time to talk about some of Android’s flaws, again, spending much of the time on fragmentation. He claims that most consumers end up using devices on software “three or four years old” before they upgrade to something newer. Following that logic, that means most consumer devices are running Gingerbread or earlier… which isn’t true. Is there room for improvement on updating Android devices? Absolutely. Is it a flaw in the platform that ruins Android as a whole? Absolutely not.

Even as an Android fan, it’s obvious Apple makes solid devices that consumers want, and it’s impossible to say that either iOS or Android is objectively a better OS or platform. But generally, it’s better for everyone when you make hardware and software to beat your competitors instead of down-talking the guys on the other side of the fence.

source: Business Week

Google and Apple CEOs Are Meeting For Behind-The-Scenes Patent Talks

by Ed Caggiani on
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The Patent Wars of 2012 already claimed one victim to the tune of $1.05 billion, and they don’t seem to be stopping any time soon. Now it seems it’s time to get the grown-ups involved. According to reports from Reuters, Google CEO Larry Page and Apple CEO Tim Cook have been conducting closed-door meetings about patents, intellectual property issues, and other things CEO’s talk about.

Apparently, the two head-honchos already had a phone talk last week, and talks at lower levels are also occurring between the companies. More talks between Page and Cook are expected in the coming weeks, but a Friday appointment has apparently been postponed to an unknown date, and for unknown reasons, though it could just be scheduling conflicts.

We’re not sure exactly what the talks involve, but one source has speculated that it could be the beginning of a truce about the disputes over basic features and functions in Android. I would tend to think these two would more likely talk at a higher level, discussing a possible broad settlement, rather than getting bogged down in the minute details of every issue. One thing’s for certain, though. The majority of their differences revolve around the rapidly growing mobile space, which is obviously of crucial important to both companies.

I, for one, applaud the intent of these discussions, and hope it can bring an end to all the litigation, which is only good for the lawyers involved. Will it bear fruit? I hope so, but I’m not holding my breath.

source: reuters

Apple COO Tim Cook mentions new Android tablets are ‘vapor’

by Jesse Bauer on
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During a telephone interview, Apple COO Tim Cook had a few things to say about the iPad’s competition with Windows and Android. He stated that he thinks “there’s not much” competition in the tablet world when put up against the iPad due mainly to Apple’s approach to integrated development for the iPad (and other apple products) as well as Apple’s App Stores being more abundant.

To keep the hits coming, he mentions that Android tablets are nothing more than “scaled-up smartphones”, continue to have fragmentation issues, and are ‘vapor’ in many minds due to the lack of pricing and launch dates from the onslaught of Android tablets announced at CES 2011.

He has a couple of points, because we’ve heard many issues and different sides of the story when it comes to fragmentation and development within Android. Also, we have heard from many that tablets with Android 2.2 or 2.3 are just big smartphones. One thing he’s neglecting to mention is what happens when all these tablets do launch, with Android 3.0, which has been tailored for tablet use. It may be the same story as how Android took over smartphone market share in activated phones. There’s going to be a lot of new Android tablets out this year, and maybe 1 new iPad.

When that happens, we’ll see flooding market penetration as we did with Android smartphones, the more being released is another option for users to switch over from the iPad. It may take a while mind you, but it really comes down to numbers in the end.

If you’d like to hear the actual interview with Tim Cook, click the source link below.

[via Engadget]