Google will sell wireless service through Sprint’s network

Google_Cell_Tower_01Just yesterday rumors started swirling about Google finally getting the mobile network market by partnering with either Sprint or T-Mobile. Less than 24 hours later, it looks like Google has closed a deal with Sprint and will soon begin offering a wireless service to compete with the other major carriers.

According to an insider, Masayoshi Son, president of Sprint’s parent company Softbank, was the key player in getting talks going between the two companies. The deal will function like most other MNVO deals, with Google paying Sprint for capacity, then Google will sell the service to customers. 
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Google will soon offer wireless service through Sprint and T-Mobile

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It has often been rumored that Google will eventually get into the wireless mobile game, and it looks like that dream will come true. As part of something codenamed Nova, Google won’t be starting their own service, but will instead opt to be an MVNO for Sprint and T-Mobile.

If you’re not familiar with what an MVNO is, it’s a mobile virtual network operator, or basically a re-seller of another carrier’s service. For example, Ting is a Sprint MVNO and Straight Talk is the same for both T-Mobile and AT&T. You can now add Google to the mix.


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T-Mobile is attracting new customers and retaining existing ones

John Legere

Earlier this month, T-Mobile recapped 2014 and proved to everyone that consumers are very much aware of the carrier’s advantages. T-Mobile does trail behind the other carrier’s in a few areas such as size, but there is one area that no one else can beat. When it comes to attracting new customers and retaining existing ones, T-Mobile is the winner. Research firm Consumer Intelligence Partners (CIRP) discovered that the amount of consumers feeling won over by T-Mobile was much greater than by Verizon, AT&T, or Sprint. Among the big four carriers, T-Mobile’s percentage of new customers and retained customers was unrivaled.

Via: CNET

T-Mobile makes “Simply Prepaid” program available to prepaid customers at low costs

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T-Mobile has continued to offer competitive deals to prepaid customers, luring them away from other carriers. Today, the company unveiled a “Simply Prepaid” program that is sure to keep the trend going.

The plan offers unlimited talk and text, and as much 4G LTE data as you’re willing to pay for, with plans starting as low as $40/month:

  • $40 / month for unlimited data, talk and text + up to 1GB of 4G LTE
  • $50 / month for unlimited data, talk and text + up to 3GB of 4G LTE
  • $60 / month for unlimited data, talk and text + up to 5GB of 4G LTE

Those on the plan will also be able to take advantage of Wi-Fi calling at no extra charge. Hit the break for the full press release from T-Mobile.


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T-Mobile will carry the YotaPhone 2 this year

yotaphone_2We know that one US carrier plans on selling the YotaPhone 2, but up until now, we didn’t have any specific information about which carrier that would be. The latest rumors point to T-Mobile picking up the device sometime in the spring, likely around March to April. That makes sense, considering T-Mobile tends to be the carrier that takes chances on devices that the other three major carriers won’t sell.
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Verizon adjusts T-Mobile’s 4G LTE coverage in new promo

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Near the end of 2014, Verizon was faced with some criticism regarding one of its advertisements that featured a map of a competitor’s 4G LTE coverage. The ad compared its network to that of T-Mobile; however, it was greatly skewed in favor of Verizon. The map portrayed T-Mobile’s 4G LTE coverage as extremely scarce by removing the HSPA/HSPA+ coverage. Yesterday, Big Red uploaded an updated version of the ad which shows a much more purple map of the United States (above). The coverage is still dwarfed by Verizon’s but T-Mobile has committed heavily to its growth.

Hit the break for the videos.


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Verizon launches Galaxy Note Edge for $399.99 on a 2-year contract

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Hot on the heals of US Cellular, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile, Verizon has now joined the party to launch the curved variant of Samsung’s flagship phablet, the Galaxy Note Edge, in the United States.

The handset will set you back $399.99 on any of Big Red’s two-year plans or $799.99 unlocked. You can also bag yourself one for $33.33 per month if you happen to be a member of the carrier’s Edge program.


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T-Mobile gains 2.1 million customers in last quarter, 8.3 million in 2014

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We are in a new year and that means companies are disclosing 2014 performances. For T-Mobile, it was an excellent year with substantial growth. The carrier gained 2.1 million customers in the final quarter of 2014 and that means 8.3 million were added throughout the entire year. So many people could be switching to T-Mobile because its 4G LTE network now covers 265 million people.

John Legere, T-Mobile CEO, had this to say about the carrier’s 2014 performance:

“We continued to take share from our competitors and attracted 8.3 million net customers in 2014 who were looking for value, simplicity, and transparency. While my competitors are hiding behind less valuable connected device subscriber additions and managing profit expectations to the downside, T-Mobile delivered over 2.1 million customers in Q4, while managing the balance between growth and profitability. Needless to say, 2014 was a record breaking year.”

Hit the break for T-Mobile’s highlights.


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Google wants regulators to free up vacant spectrum to give consumers cheaper alternatives for wireless data

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Everyone is sick of the data caps that cell phone companies have imposed on us. It’s one thing to cap data, but it’s another to over charge for services rendered. I have been saying all long that Google will fix this mess and they are already making steps toward it.

They are lobbying with regulators to free up vacant spectrum that is not only low cost, but useless to the U.S. carriers. They would like to see as much as 150 megahertz of specturm around the 3.5 gigahertz band. The idea is to leave it open to anyone without a license, but set aside some of it for companies to use exclusively.


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