HTC Droid DNA gets Flash Image GUI support

Verizon has a tendency to lock down phones on their network, but fortunately, Big Red hasn’t been able to ruin the developer experience on the Droid DNA. Just to show its resilience, the Droid DNA has been added to the list of supported devices in Flash Image GUI. Flash Image GUI is a neat little app that lets you flash kernels and recoveries without rebooting to recovery. If you’re the kind of person who likes to flash something new on their phone a few times a week, this app is a huge time saver. But remember that anytime you flash new software on your device, it can be risky, so be sure to keep a reliable backup just in case things go awry. If you’re a Droid DNA owner who wants to give the app a go, hit the link below.

source: XDA

A handful of Nexus devices get AOKP build MR1

AOKP, one of the more popular aftermarket Android ROMs available, finally released a few stable builds for Nexus devices, labeled MR1. And, despite having to start over from scratch with the 4.2 code, most older features have ported forward. There’s a ton of stability improvements and customization options on top of Google’s feature-filled flavor of Jelly Bean.

If you’ve got a Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, or Nexus 7, hit the source below to get your hands on the ROM. The Galaxy S III and Note II are expected to be in the next release, and it wouldn’t surprise me to see the Nexus 10 show up as well. Flash away!

source: AOKP

Republic Wireless Confirms That It Doesn’t Look Too Kindly Upon Customers That Root Devices

 

Republic Wireless may be on its way to being a revolutionary wireless provider, however in order to be a revolutionary wireless provider— it has to ensure that its offers a topnotch service to its customers free of any type of shenanigans or tomfoolery. This means keeping its various devices offered to its customers free of tools like rooting, which may enhance a customer’s service at the expense of Republic Wireless’s  philosophy. With this in mind, there has been a recent rise in customers’ interest in rooting their devices and Republic Wireless decided to take some time and share its position on not just rooting, but any sort of unauthorized device customization:

 

“We’ve seen a flurry of questions and comments recently, and we wanted to provide some answers and a bit of context. The burning question these days is whether or not it’s ok to root your phone. The short answer is no. You agreed to the Terms of Service when you joined republic, and if you don’t follow the Terms, we can terminate your service at any time”.

 


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Run Jelly Bean 4.2.1 on your Kindle Fire

As mentioned in this space before, it never ceases to amaze what the developers over at XDA can cook up. One dev’s latest feat is actually getting Jelly Bean to run on the ‘outdated’ 512MB RAM equipped Amazon Kindle Fire. As with a lot of hacks, there are some features missing (at the time of this writing) such as Swype keyboard, USB camera support, and photo sync.

However, you do get the benefits of Google Now along with a straight port of basically the exact ROM being pushed to Nexus 7 and 10 users. The process itself is very much like flashing other ROMs on other devices, so those that are familiar with it will feel right at home. If you need to brush up on your rooting skills, you can check our guide and dictionary to assist. Click the source link below for the full list of instructions.

source:  XDA

And Then The Bootloader Was Unlocked: Verizon Galaxy Note II Is One Step Closer To Custom Glory

 

Time to pop the champagne bottles and have a celebration if you’re an owner of the Verizon Galaxy Note II— the bootloader looks to have been officially unlocked. Thanks to the tireless work of a few hard-working individuals, they have cracked what is the hardest part of the Galaxy Note II’s shell– despite Big Red’s strong insistence on keeping its devices “safe and secure”. The way the Galaxy Note II’s bootloader was cracked is quite ingenious too actually– all that was needed to do was to trick the Galaxy Note II into thinking it’s a device that’s 0.7-inches smaller and eventually flashing a PIT file in order to revert back to the Galaxy Note II’s original identity after the phone has been unlocked. The method has only been tested on one device as of this time, but with more time and usage of this method— we should see this unlock exploit work on most, if not all Verizon Galaxy Note II variants.

So we have root and now we have an unlocked bootloader. All we need now is those ROMs to eventually start a’flowin’! Hopefully you Galaxy Note II owners don’t have to wait too much longer for some of that custom ROM goodness.

source: Adam Outen+

How to download CyanogenMod ROM updates faster by using only 10MB of data

I’ll admit it; I’m a flashaholic. The only problem is that I don’t like that each nightly update is at least 150MB for my particular device. Even though I have unlimited data, it’s still not cool to either wait a while for the latest update to download via my carrier (non-LTE) or having to wait until I get home to do so via WiFi. Granted, this is probably not an issue to most, but if you like your nightlies, then you’ll definitely like this little gem of an app called CyanDelta which makes managing those various CyanogenMod updates a much more easier process. Hit the break to see how you can grab your precious updates without using up too much data.
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Verizon Galaxy Note 2 now has root

The Note 2 has been available on Verizon for less than a week and it’s already been rooted to join the rest of the family. Like other Samsung phones, it involves using ODIN to flash a rooted image file. Unlike the other versions of the Note 2, there are a few bugs. The phone signal indicator breaks, although data does still work, and some users report that it’s not quite as fast as the stock image. Regardless, I’m sure the bugs will be worked out soon.

The bootloader is still locked, so no custom ROMs (yet) but it doesn’t usually take too long to solve these “problems.” If you’re a Verizon Note 2 owner, hit the link below to get started.

source: XDA

Android Newbie’s Guide to Rooting

 

Newbie’s Guide to Rooting

If you’re reading this article, chances are you’re either already rooted or thinking about rooting your device. The thing with rooting is that instead of folks falling into two different camps, I believe there are three camps. In my opinion, we’re either rooted, don’t even want to think about rooting, or we’re kind of intrigued by the idea but don’t want to go through the hassle or risk of rooting our device. This guide is more for the latter. My intent is not to sway anyone one way or the other. This is simply to try to keep things simple, while providing resources and knowledge from first-hand experience, and enabling you to make your own informed decision. While I’m not going to walk you step-by-step on how to root your specific device (we’ll be here forever going through each device); I will introduce you to the concept of rooting, reliable sources for reading, things to do before rooting, the benefits of rooting, and what to do after you’re rooted. 
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Nexus 4 gets its first taste of CM 10.1 nightly builds

Proud owner of a Nexus 4? Tired of waiting for Cyanogenmod? Good news! The CM team has rolled out their first nightly build based on Android 4.2. You’ll have to be rooted to install it, of course, and it’s important to remember that nightly builds may not always be perfectly stable, but it’s great to see the next generation of CM taking shape. Hit the download link below to get started.

source: Cyanogenmod