Chainfire’s latest beta SuperSU app fixes Lollipop root bugs

supersu_app_iconRoot access was achieved on Lollipop not long after its official release, but there have been many issues with root apps on Lollipop not working like they did on KitKat and below. Much of this has to do with Android 5.0′s implementation of SELinux for additional security.

Fortunately, Chainfire has been working on potentially fixing many of those broken root apps, and his latest SuperSU beta claims to resolve many of the issues. This SuperSU beta version 2.23 is freely available for download on Chainfire’s website in the form of a flashable zip, and he’s opened a thread on XDA to track which apps are now working correctly and what still needs to be addressed.
Read more

CF-Auto Root updated for Android Lollipop on Nexus devices

android_lollipop_tweet

Want a quick way to root your Nexus device?

In the past, one such option has been CF-Auto Root — until now, that option hasn’t been available for Lollipop users.

But with a recent update by XDA Senior Recognized Developer Chainfire, Nexus devices running Android 5.0 can join in on the fun. Hit the break for details:


Read more

Legendary developer Chainfire roots Nexus 9 mere hours after the source code is made public

google_nexus_9_color_fan

It was only a matter of time before the Nexus 9 was rooted, and thanks to veteran developer Chainfire, that time is now. Less than a few hours after the source code for the HTC-designed tablet was released, Chainfire has come up with a root method that will be familiar to anyone who has used ADB and FastBoot in the past. If you’re looking to get down and dirty with your new tablet, hit the source for instructions on how to get started.

Source: XDA

Google Chromecast regains Rootability

Chromecast_dongle (1)
Google had all but locked down its media-streaming device, the Google Chromecast, soon after its release, but if you’ve been waiting for root access to your device since then, your time has officially come. According to the XDA developers forum, developers GTVHacker, Team-Eureka, and fail0verflow have exploited a new vulnerability which allows root access to the current software build and new models.
Read more

Verizon Galaxy S5 receiving update which brings bevy of bug-fixes, breaks root access [Update - T-Mobile too]

Galaxy-S5-Black

Verizon’s Samsung Galaxy S5 is receiving an update (software version KOT49H.G900VVRU1ANE9) which is bringing a bunch of bug fixes to the device, but also seems to be breaking root access to the device, according to a number of users around the web.

The update keeps the phone at Android 4.4.2, and update’s Verizon’s Caller Name ID, Message+ and Cloud apps.


Read more

LG G Watch gets toolkit for rooting, unlocking, flashing and restoring capabilities

LG_G_Watch_Main_Screen_On_TA

The Nexus Root Toolkit from Wugfresh has become insanely popular since the interest in unlocking bootloaders and rooting devices has expanded to “normal” consumers.

Now, those with an LG G Watch will be able to root and unlock the device just as easily as Wugfresh’s Nexus solution provides.


Read more

SuperSU 2.01 update gets support for Android L Developer Preview

supersu_app_icon

Chainfire’s SuperSU app has been updated today to build in support for the Android L developer preview. Before now, rooting the developer preview involved a few workarounds with custom boot images so root permissions should work properly, but that should all be fixed up now.

If you’ve been using the L developer preview, have you tried rooting it yet, or are you fine with using a non-rooted device?

source: XDA Developers

Verizon and AT&T Galaxy S 5 finally get root method

Samsung_Galaxy_S_5_Back_Bottom_Galaxy_S_5_Logo_TA

Verizon and AT&T did an excellent job of locking down their version of the Galaxy S 5, preventing any type of root exploit on the device for several months after release. Tons of people put up money for a bounty to get their Galaxy S 5 unlocked, topping out at around $18,000, and today developer Geohot from XDA gets to claim that bounty.

Geohot, known for tons of jailbreak exploits on Apple devices and the PS3, found a vulnerability in the Linux kernel that Android is based on to achieve root access on the GS 5. As a side effect to that exploit, the root method should work on most newer Android devices, including the previously unrootable Galaxy Note 3 and plenty of other devices.

If you’ve got a Galaxy S 5 (or other device you need to root) hit the link to test out the Towelroot app. Let us know how it goes in the comments.

source: XDA Developers

Here are the top functions and apps available on Android that are NOT on iOS

android ios

Because there are so many different Android devices (and so many variants of those individual devices), developers tend to begin programming their apps on iOS before putting together the resources (and endless hours) to begin porting their creations to Android.

Developing for Android is an arduous task, and Google knows it. That’s why the company will soon be making a concerted effort to streamline the development process. Google has also pushed manufacturers/carriers to stay as close to stock Android as possible by criticizing bloatware and OEM custom skins. But with different phones running different processors, having different amounts of RAM, different screen sizes/resolutions, etc., it’s tough to make sure an app will work seamlessly across the platform, no matter what Google does to ease the process. Android’s vast device offering can be seen as a major strength (and something that has led the platform to be an industry leader in market share) but it’s also been a weakness from the development side.


Read more

Moto E already rooted with unofficial TWRP recovery

Moto_E_White_Shells

The Moto E ships with close to stock Android and an unlockable bootloader, so it was pretty obvious it wouldn’t take long before the device was rooted and ready for custom ROMs. Thanks to XDA, you can now root the device and install an unofficial TWRP recovery on the device.

The root process is pretty simple and uses Chainfire’s SuperSU updater and can be done with the stock recovery or TWRP. Flashing the recovery takes a bit longer, but it’s still relatively painless thanks to Motorola keeping the Moto E an open device. However, Motorola hasn’t released the source code for the Moto E kernel, so touch screen support is a bit weird in recovery, but that’s a small price to pay.

You can get the complete (and short) instructions at the link below.

source: XDA Developers