Android patent lawsuit between Samsung and Microsoft settled

Lawsuits_stockimage

In what has to be one of the quickest resolutions to a patent lawsuit between tech giants in recent history, Microsoft and Samsung have announced a settlement over patent royalties for some code included in Samsung’s Android devices. The lawsuit stemmed from an agreement reached between the two companies in 2011 that flared up in August 2014 when Microsoft accused Samsung of breach of contract.
Read more

Latest Samsung patent offers new design clue about the upcoming Galaxy S Edge

Samsung_dual_edge_patent_pop_up_01

Samsung is expected to not only unveil the Galaxy S 6 next month at Mobile World Congress, but they will also likely reveal the Galaxy S Edge. The Galaxy S Edge should be the Galaxy S 6, but with two curved edges, one at the right side and one at the left. A new design patent, submitted by Samsung, shows one other extra special feature that could end up on this device.


Read more

Samsung offers to purchase BlackBerry

BlackBerry_Logo_033

In the surprise news of the day, Samsung recently made an offer to buy BlackBerry for $7.5 billion. Reuters is reporting that Samsung set the initial price range of $13.35 to $15.49 per share, which translates to a premiumof 38 percent to 60 percent over the current trading price.

So what would Samsung want with such a failing company? According to Reuters, it’s all about the patents. BlackBerry owns roughly 44,000 patents, worth approximately $1.43 billion in net book value. However, a lot of analysts think they are worth much more. Unfortunately BlackBerry isn’t interested in selling only the patents, so Samsung would need to buy the whole company in order to obtain them.


Read more

USPTO stays busy in 2014, Samsung awarded 4925 patents for the year

google_vs_samsung

IBM, Samsung, and even Google made it onto the top 10 list for patents awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). While IBM and Samsung take the top two spots (IBM dominated Samsung with 7534 patents awarded), Google comes in on the leader board at number 8, which is the first time the Mountain View search giant has appeared in the top 10.

The past few years have been a total pain for Samsung when it’s come to patents. In a near-constant state of being bogged down by infringement lawsuits, Samsung may be attempting to prevent such legal actions in the future by dutifully applying for as many patents as it can. Compared to 2013, Samsung’s patent awards increased 5.9% in 2014.
Read more

Patent portfolio sale sign of détente for smartphone industry?

rpx_logo

In another sign of the continuing end of hostilities between the world’s smartphone manufacturers, Rockstar Consortium, Inc. has announced the sale of 4,000 patents to RPX Corp. The portfolio was originally obtained by Rockstar in a bidding war that took place during 2011 between Rockstar and Google to obtain the intellectual property from Nortel Networks. Rockstar is a consortium made up of Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, Ericsson and Sony. RPX licenses patents to companies that join their syndicate, including Google and Cisco Systems.
Read more

NVIDIA responds to false advertising lawsuit filed by Samsung

NVIDIA_Tegra_3_CES_2013NVIDIA recently filed a lawsuit against Samsung and Qualcomm for violating seven of NVIDIA’s GPU patents. Samsung filed a counter lawsuit, of course, claiming that NVIDIA violated six patents, and Velocity, a small client of NVIDIA’s, violated eight patents. Samsung also claims that NVIDIA is using false advertising when they say the Tegra K1 CPU is the “world’s fastest mobile processor,” as Samsung believes the Note 4′s Exynos 5433 is faster.

NVIDIA has responded to this lawsuit, and it’s definitely putting Samsung in a negative light for dragging a much smaller company (Velocity) into the mix. The response accuses Samsung of suing Velocity to keep the lawsuit in Virgina where Velocity is based, as Virgina has a faster time to trial than most other places in the US. It makes sense for Samsung, but it feels like a cheap shot at the much smaller company.
Read more