T-Mobile launches ‘Bring your own device’ program on MetroPCS

 

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Recently T-Mobile has been able to officially secure its purchase of MetroPCS. Its first move is to get users to start using their GSM based service, or vice versa with Metro’s CDMA technology. In a sense, customers can go into a MetroPCS store with a device and activate it using T-Mobile’s GSM bands. The same can also be said with MetroPCS customers as they can head into T-Mobile stores and have their CDMA device activated. The MetroPCS BYOD program is only available in Boston, Dallas, Hartford, and Las Vegas with plans to expand soon.

Of course T-Mobile’s future plans for MetroPCS is to eventually use their LTE bands to help broaden theirs. That will take some time and I see this BYOD program a good step into getting customers into using both T-Mobile’s and MetroPCS’ service. This program is only for Android, iPhone and Windows devices. Sadly Blackberry phones will not be supported.

source: FierceWireless

T-Mobile/MetroPCS merger is complete, new company now known as T-Mobile US

T-Mobile MetroPCS Merger

 

At last, the T-Mobile/MetroPCS marriage is officially complete. After seeing a few signs that the merger was closer to being finalized, Deutsche Telekom AG and T-Mobile US, Inc. announced the newly-formed T-Mobile USA entity— which officially began public trading under the NYSE ticker TMUS as of today. With the new company fully established, Deutsche Telekom AG will effectively hold a majority stake in the company (at 74%), while the combined subscriber base grows to over 40 million. Additionally, the completed merger also expands the total 4G footprint as 228 million are currently served with 4G, with an additional 200 million expected to be covered with 4G LTE by the end of 2013.

You’ll find more details once you hit the break and check out the full presser.


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MetroPCS shareholders give T-Mobile USA merger the green light

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Not too long ago, Deutsche Telekom sweetened the deal for shareholders in MetroPCS to try to grease the wheels of its proposed T-Mobile/MetroPCS merger. And, good news for both companies today, the shareholders in MetroPCS have approved that deal. While it won’t be finalized today, the deal will reportedly be completed by May 1st, so it shouldn’t take too much longer, especially since it’s already past the difficult regulatory approval stage.

T-Mobile has already put their foot on the gas trying to be competitive with some of the bigger carriers, so hopefully this merger will give them a little more ammunition.

source: Bloomberg

Dish Network in talks with Deutsche Telekom about T-Mobile merge

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Deutshe Telekom, who is already in the process of overseeing the T-Mobile/MetroPCS merger, was recently approached by Dish Network’s chairman to discuss a possible merge between Dish and T-Mobile. This proposition was before April 10th, when Deutshe Telekom announced their revised T-Mobile deal. Currently, there’s nothing concrete about these “talks.” Deutshe Telekom is fully invested in taking care of their current merger, and will only consider the deal after the current MetroPCS transaction is over and after they’ve verified a deal with Sprint Nextel isn’t possible.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen Dish try to wedge themselves into the mobile market, and I seriously doubt it’ll be the last, assuming this merger never happens. We’ll be sure to keep you updated as soon as any other details come to light.

source: Bloomberg

Deutsche Telekom Approves Better Deal For MetroPCS Merger

T-Mobile

Deutsche Telekom has been working to merge its U.S. carrier, T-Mobile, with MetroPCS, and last month received complete regulatory approval. The German company thought the original deal was good, but MetroPCS shareholders disagreed. In an effort to save the merger and finalize it, they approved a better deal today. This new deal will lower the amount of debt transferred to the new company and lower the interest rate on that debt. Lowering the amount of debt transferred means a more valuable equity stake. MetroPCS shareholders are currently being offered about $4 per share in cash and a 26% stake in the combined company. Votes are already being held in advance of a scheduled shareholder meeting Friday and according to an insider, it’s not looking like the deal will go through in its current form.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

MetroPCS adds Huawei Premia 4G to stable of LTE devices

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Huawei and MetroPCS announced today the addition of the Huawei Premia 4G to MetroPCS’s portfolio of 4G LTE devices. The Premia 4G is a 4-inch device equipped with a 1.5 GHz dual-core processor, 1GB of RAM, and a 5 MP camera. The device will run Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. MetroPCS will include their joyn by MetroPCS app on the devices to give customers the ability to make video calls or take advantage of WiFi calling.

MetroPCS is making the Premia 4G available for $149 with no contract. Check out more images and the full press release after the break.
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T-Mobile And MetroPCS Merger Receives Complete Regulatory Approval

T-Mobile MetroPCS Merger

Back in October, Deutsche Telekom struck a deal to merge T-Mobile USA with MetroPCS for $1.5 billion in cash and a 26% stake in the combined company. Now, the merger has been approved by regulators which gets it one step closer to final approval. On April 12, MetroPCS shareholders will vote to approve the merger. Moving forward, T-Mobile has an event scheduled on March 26 which is when they’re expected to talk about the new “UNcarrier plans” and possibly more details about the MetroPCS merger now that it received regulatory approval.

Source: MetroPCS – Investor Relations

New VoLTE tests show improved battery life for second generation

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As we watch newer, faster smartphones come to market, many of us may gloss over one of the original uses of the devices – phone calls. Manufacturers and carriers have not forgotten though and as they have been working to rollout 4G LTE services, they have realized they could shift voice traffic over to the LTE network, but not without some challenges. To address the situation, some carriers have been looking at moving voice traffic onto the LTE network using technology referred to as VoLTE, Voice over LTE. The problem is that LTE was designed to move data not voice. In addition, LTE currently does not carry SMS traffic which accounts for a large portion of the revenue stream. To make voice calls over LTE means the use of some type of VOIP technology to convert the voice call into data, which means more computing overhead and thus, more demands on a smartphone’s battery. This concept was found to be true in testing in late 2012. MetroPCS and LG have been working to improve this situation as revealed in the results of recent tests.
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T-Mobile/MetroPCS FCC approval may be near as vote date approaches for MetroPCS

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With MetroPCS scheduled to vote on a merger with T-Mobile only a couple weeks away, the deal appears to have moved closer to obtaining FCC approval. An attorney for the Communication Workers of America Union claims the deal will be approved “at the bureau level instead of the commission level.” The union is watching the proceedings closely as they have concerns about the merger and this apparent move by the FCC to usher approval on through does not sit well with the union. Debbie Goldman, a director with the CWA refers to the possible FCC decision as “outrageous” and “unprecedented.” Despite the CWA’s concerns, others see this latest development as positive news. David Kuat, an analyst with Stifel Nicolaus & Co., believes the lack of commission level action reveals the deal to be “basically non-controversial” and that “no one thinks this is going to be blocked.”

source: TmoNews

Department of Justice (DOJ) Sanctions T-Mobile/Metro PCS Merger

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Okay, so maybe they don’t openly sanction the merger, but it sure appears that way when you analyze it. The DOJ has let an important antitrust law waiting period expire, which opens the floor back up to the merger. The waiting period, which was required under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, was enacted to control monopolies across various industries.

Of course, this is not the only Antitrust law in place to control monopolies, so the two powerhouses will still have a few hurdles to overcome before they can make the merger final. The next hurdle will be getting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to approve the transfer of spectrum licenses.
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