Samsung set to defend itself in court after leaking confidential Apple documents

by Jared Peters on
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During the many, many lawsuits and court battles that Samsung and Apple have engaged in, there have been some occasions where each company has had access to private documents and information from the other company. Of course, that information should only ever be used in the context of the legal battles, but apparently Samsung had a different idea.

In one phase of Apple and Samsung’s patent fight, Apple gave Samsung confidential documents explaining their patent agreements with companies like Nokia, Ericsson, Sharp, and Philips. The court issued a protective order that was supposed to prevent Samsung from doing anything with those documents that wasn’t related to the lawsuit. According to Apple, Samsung leaked that information to roughly 90 employees and 130 unauthorized lawyers, which is a pretty big leak. Samsung executive Dr. Seungho Ahn attempted to use the information to strong-arm Nokia into a licensing agreement, but now that Nokia has joined Apple’s side in a motion for sanctions, I’m sure Samsung regrets the idea. » Read the rest

Samsung just can’t catch a break: Obama administration vetoes U.S. sales ban of older Apple devices

by Robert Nazarian on
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It wasn’t a huge win for Samsung, but at least it was something. Back in June, the U.S. International Trade Commission awarded Samsung a sales ban on AT&T models of the iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPad 3G, and iPad 2 3G. Yes, I know these are older devices, but it was one of the very few wins for Samsung.

Apparently the Obama Administration seems to be fans of the Romper Room style iOS because they just vetoed the ban. Hit the break for the full text.

» Read the rest

Samsung wins U.S. sales ban of several older Apple devices

by Jeff Causey on
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Samsung scored a point today in their ongoing legal volleys with Apple as the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled Apple violated a Samsung patent. In prevailing, the ITC awarded Samsung an import and sales ban on AT&T models of the iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPad 3G and iPad 2 3G. You may recall a while back when ads were running showing Apple device owners using their iOS powered devices performing several functions at one time, like talking on the phone will placing an online order via the web browser. It was this ability to stream multiple data streams that triggered Samsung’s action. » Read the rest

German court invalidates Apple’s slide-to-unlock patent in patent suit with Motorola

by Jared Peters on
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Patent suits involving Motorola and Apple have been relatively quiet lately, but that doesn’t mean they’ve ceased entirely. The latest comes from a German court that has ruled Apple’s infamous slide-to-unlock patent invalid in their case against Motorola. Apple tried to show 14 different amendments to the patent to keep it valid, but the German court disagreed.

While this is technically a win for Motorola, most Android manufacturers have put workarounds in place to avoid infringing on Apple’s slide-to-unlock patent. Had Apple been able to continue using that patent, it wouldn’t have given them any notable advantage over other manufacturers. Still, we can chalk this one up as a win for common sense and call it a day.

source: FOSS Patents

Android tethering could be threatened by judge’s patent ruling in favor of Nokia

by Jeff Causey on
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In case you missed it among the seemingly constant back and forth between Samsung and Apple in the world’s courtrooms, there is a patent case about to get underway between HTC and Nokia regarding some alleged patent infringements. The bad news for Android fans is that Judge Thomas Pender has issued a ruling that could negatively impact any Android devices that make a tethering feature available. Nokia has asserted that HTC is infringing on U.S. Patent No 5,884,190 describing a “method for making a data transmission connection from a computer to a mobile communication network for transmission of analog and/or digital signals.” The court case between Nokia and HTC is scheduled to start in a couple months, but this ruling regarding the interpretation of the 190 patent makes it difficult for HTC to deny infringement.

The case between the two companies involves about 40 patents that Nokia has asserted HTC infringes. Google is involved in the case as a third-party intervenor supporting HTC. Both HTC and Google had hoped to narrow the scope of the 190 patent, but failed to do so. The two companies will now have to somehow prove the patent is invalid, such as due to prior art. Proving the existence of prior art could be a challenge since Nokia obtained the patent in 1995, a time when the web was still in its infancy and mobile devices were closer to bricks than what we have today. If HTC fails to make their case during the trial, they may also try to sway the ITC commission to overrule the judge.

If Nokia succeeds during the trial in showing HTC has infringed on the 190 patent, one of the likely results will be an import ban on all HTC devices into the U.S. Nokia will also be in a strong position to pursue other Android device manufacturers, much like they have already done against Apple and Blackberry. In the end, most companies will probably opt to pay a royalty to Nokia in order to keep the feature available.

source: FOSS Patents
via: PhoneArena

Samsung piles on US lobbying spending after lengthy court battles with Apple

by Jared Peters on
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We’re pretty familiar with Samsung’s constant legal battle with Apple all over the world, and especially in the US. Samsung, having quite a bit of extra cash to play with, upped their legal spending on US lobbyists last year to $900,000, up from just $150,000 in 2011. That’s a pretty significant jump. The extra spending is an attempt to sway the federal government on many legal issues, including IP copyright and telecommunication infrastructure. Samsung also hired former Sony veteran Joel Wigington to run a Washington office.

The mobile market is expected to be worth $847 billion in 2016, so this is obviously a really sweet pie that everyone wants a piece of, Samsung included. The lawsuits aren’t likely to let up, so it wouldn’t be surprising to see other companies beef up their legal presence to defend against (or initiate more of) those lawsuits.

source: Bloomberg

The Android iPhone lives: Apple loses exclusivity rights to iPhone trademark in Brazil

by Nathan Alvarez on
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Back in 2000, 7 years before Apple debuted the infamous iPhone, a local Brazilian company called Gradiente Eletronica registered a phone with the same name. As you might expect, Apple has been in courts with the company attempting to claim exclusive rights to use the name internationally. As it turns out, the regulators handling this case ruled in favor of Gradiente Electronica and denied Apple the rights to hold the name exclusively in Brazil. However, the ruling did give Apple exclusivity rights for the iPhone name on items such as clothing, software and various publications.

» Read the rest

Samsung EVP believes Apple attack against Samsung is “a loss” of innovation

by Roy Alugbue on
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It’s no secret that many of us believe that Apple’s ongoing attack against Samsung is a waste of time and is shameful to say the least, but the ongoing attack can be considered as something even worse. While speaking at the opening night of D:Dive Into Media 2013, Samsung EVP David Eun did not dabble into specifics regarding the continuing litigations that are a waste of time, money and resources— but rather he made it very clear that the ongoing dispute is “a loss” for innovation and more importantly— us, the consumer. So it’s pretty cool finally hearing something that we can all agree upon from such a high-ranking official at Samsung.

Hopefully Apple will realize sooner than later that it’s probably not worth it to keep going on with the petty and meaningless battle.

source: Engadget

Apple CEO Tim Cook says Steve Jobs overruled him on patent suits against Samsung

by Nathan Alvarez on
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Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that Apple and Samsung have been in a patent war since 2011. Current CEO Tim Cook has been on record as saying that he does not like to participate in what he calls “patent litigation” and apparently he wasn’t lying. According to a lengthy article provided by Reuters, Cook claims that the late Steve Jobs, Apple’s co-founder and former CEO, opposed and overruled him on the decision to go after Samsung in court for patent infringement.

» Read the rest

CyanogenMod Takes Down Chronus Clock Widget Because Of Trademarked Name, Wants People On Facebook To Make Up A New Name Instead

by Roy Alugbue on
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CyanogenMod recently introduced an awesome new Chronus clock widget that was certainly welcome with open arms. But just as quickly as the clock widget was introduced, Chronus was taken down thanks to a friendly cease & desist letter from those who have the “Cronus” name trademarked. What this means is that the CM team just wanted to avoid any costly and unnecessary trouble by getting into a legal battle, so it took the entire clock widget down… despite the clock being unique in design compared to the general design of “Cronus”.

So while the widget is down for now— fear not gang: all the CM team needs to do is simply rename the app and it should be available again without issue. In order to rename the app, it has gone out to its Facebook page and ask you the people to do the dirty work and come up with an awesome replacement name. Hopefully the CM team will have this done sooner than later.

source: CM Facebook