Always Right Cord backers couldn’t get transparency, so I stepped in

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I’ve backed projects on Kickstarter multiple times, but never anything major or lavish that I had to really think about. It’s just because I get a little thrill out of contributing assistance to the people behind these projects, brilliant men and women wanting to take their idea from just that, an idea, to a real product offered to consumers around the world. We’ve seen great success come out of Kickstarter, and some of those successes have even been able to spawn successor. There’s a lot of good to Kickstarter, but there’s also a lot of bad to Kickstarter. Deciding to become a backer to large projects with massive campaigns is risky because of the unknown. Backers could end up losing out on their money because, once a a campaign meets its goal, the funds are secured in the creator’s account. Where’s the thrill in that? Backers can build up hope to receive an ambitious, unique product only to be left without any reward along with a weaker bank account.

Always Right Cord is a project which launched on Kickstarter on September 21, 2015. The project debuted with the purpose to create a cable that has reversible USB 2.0 and micro-USB connectors so you could simply connect your devices without worrying about connecting them into ports in any specific way. This may sound familiar because it’s part of the USB Type-C hype, but many people aren’t ready to switch to that technology. Always Right Cord’s creator, a vague profile known as Always Right, set the Kickstarter campaign’s goal at $5,000. Guess what? The goal was met the following day and proceeded to generate almost $32,000 because of 1,123 backers believing in the project.

Backers could have received their Always Right Cord in November, but it’s now February and not a single backer has received one. Delays are acceptable as long as there’s transparency, something the people behind Always Right Cord have failed to provide numerous times.

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Kickstarter project shoots to bring AdventureQuest 3D to all devices

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A Kickstarter project is trying to bring an online 3D version of MMORPG hit AdventureQuest to your computer device no matter what it may be. Like the original Flash game, AdventureQuest 3D is set in a fantasy world populated by monsters and magic. One of the goals of this latest version though is to make it cross-platform so that players can access their character and the fantasy world regardless of the device they happen to be using – smartphone, tablet or PC. Read more

Meet the Tstand: an ergonomic tablet stand

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Everyone loves using their tablets whilst sitting on the couch or laying in bed, but sometimes it can get very uncomfortable having to hold the tablet for extended periods. This is where the Tstand could come in handy, with its reversible base and adjustable viewing angle, you can view the tablet hands and strain-free. Tstand has just launched its campaign on Kickstarter, with the goal of raising $10,000.

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Always Right Cord works any way you want

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Although devices with USB Type-C ports are on the way, most hardware manufacturers will continue implementing micro-USB for charging and data transfers. A huge benefit of USB Type-C is the reversible aspect; however, the new Always Right Cord that it is currently live on Kickstarter matches that capability with a micro-USB cable. Both ends of the Always Right Cord — one connector each for micro-USB and USB — are completely reversible.

The Kickstarter campaign has blasted right through its original goal, generating more than $23,000 in pledges with eight days to go.

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The NoPhone Zero offers the least advanced technology on the market at an aggressively low price

NoPhone ZeroNew phones are offering extremely high resolution screens, fingerprint scanners, and all kinds of other ridiculous, space-age technology in rectangular packages. The NoPhone Zero takes a different approach, though, offering the least advanced in available smartphone technology. In fact, the NoPhone Zero offers so few features and does so little, you’d be surprised to learn that it’s even a phone. Read more