Google now listing price ranges for in-app purchases in Play store [Update: Developer addresses too]

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As they indicated in an announcement a couple weeks ago, Google has started listing price ranges for in-app purchases in the descriptions for applications. The data is currently only available when viewing an app’s listing using an Android smartphone or tablet. To find the information, you have to use the “Read more” link in the description section and then scroll down to the bottom where Google displays information about the application like the version number, last update, and size. The information is not showing up via desktop browsers yet.
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Real time strategy game Star Wars: Commander now available for Android

StarWarsCommanderAndroidThe popular iOS real time strategy game Star Wars: Commander that was released at the end of last month and has received a plethora of high ratings is now available for Android. Players will be able to choose between the Empire and the Rebellion. From there they can build bases, train troops, upgrade units and play with friends. The game offers an all-new story and is available in multiple languages.

As if this needs to be said, but the game offers in-app purchases. It requires Android 2.3.3 and up and we have a gallery, trailer, download link and QR code for you after the break. Enjoy!


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The Play Store could start listing in-app purchase price ranges later this month

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You probably have noticed that many apps in the Play Store have “offers in-app purchases” listed near the install icon. The only problem with that is you really don’t know if it’s one small purchase to get rid of ads or if there is a slew of options. Well it looks like Google will start listing in-app purchase price ranges soon.

This information came from Google support when they contacted the developer of GoneMad Music Player regarding Google’s new policy that all developers of paid and in-app purchase apps must provide their publicly visible address. Hit the break for the full text.


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Google agrees to refund 19 million to consumers over in-app purchases

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Google has reached a settlement with the FTC agreeing to fully refund consumers charged for their children’s in-app purchases. The decision is hardly a surprise, considering Apple reached the same agreement in January, and Amazon did the same in July. The issue arises from Google’s requiring a password for purchases every 30 minutes and “blurring the lines” between real money purchases and virtual ones. The FTC’s issue arises from a few lawsuits filed by parents looking for retribution after giving their children free reign over their devices.

Source: FTC

Fleksy updates keyboard app to version 3.0 with new look and features

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In the Android world, the third-party keyboard apps segment is a crowded one for app developers. That has not stopped developers from Fleksy from continuing to work on their version of a keyboard. The latest update that takes it up to version 3.0 introduces some new features and according to Fleksy, positions them to transition the keyboard to the iOS world when iOS 8 is released later this year.
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Games with in-app purchases will no longer be called “free”

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Everyone loves free games, but many of them are not actually free. In-app purchases within a game can make just as much money for a developer that releases a paid one without any purchases after the initial download.

The European Union feels that this is an issue for consumers since many parents have run into an problem with children making in-app purchases after a “free” game has been downloaded. Google has listened and will no longer use the word for games featuring in-app purchases. Also, the company will have restrictions built to make it not so easy for people (but primarily children) to make in-app purchases without permission. These changes will all become official in September.

Italian Antitrust Authority investigating Google, Apple, Gameloft, and Amazon over in-app purchases

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Everybody deals with those pesky in-app purchases from time to time, especially in mobile games. The in-app purchases help developers make money by luring potential customers in with a free (and often very limited) game, then hitting them with a paywall a few hours in. Sometimes levels are locked if you don’t pay for them, and sometimes leveling up your character is incredibly tedious if you don’t spend real money on in-game currency.
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Lawsuit filed against Google over in-app purchases by minors

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A class action lawsuit has been filed against Google by a New York mother who alleges Google is unfairly profiting from in-app purchases by permitting minors to make them without parents’ knowledge. The action is similar to an issue that Apple just recently resolved over a similar business model. According to one of the attorneys representing the plaintiff, Google has failed to incorporate reasonable controls that results in minors racking up excessive charges for “worthless in-game currency.”
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Google adds indicator for In-App purchases to its Play Store website

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Following the changes made to the Google Play Store app last year, Google has also made a little change to its web version of the Play Store as well. The Play Store will now indicate, below the ‘Install’ button, whether an application includes in-app purchases (IAP) as well . Google added an indicator for in-app purchases to its Play Store app last December, and it’s good to see that it has ported the change to its web version as well. 

This is useful to decide whether an app is worth the try or not. However, it’s quite difficult to determine whether the app is a freemium model and is completely based on in-app purchases or it only includes a few in-app purchases to remove certain restrictions such as Ads. 

Via: Android Police

How to add password protection to your Google Play Store account to prevent unintentional purchases

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If you’ve ever let a child play with your smartphone, then you know how worrisome that can be. A wrong tap here, another wrong tap there and your credit card might be charged for money that you’d rather keep in your account. Fortunately, Google has a hidden setting to enable password protection and prevent accidental purchases from the Google Play Store. All you need to do is follow the steps after the break and you’re golden.


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