Swiftkey announces new themes, voice typing, and bug fixes

Swiftkey announced today an update to their popular keyboard app for Android devices. For users who like to dictate instead of type, Swiftkey has enabled use of the Google voice typing tool that is available in Ice Cream Sandwich and Jelly Bean. For those into themes, Swiftkey has introduced two new ones – Sky (a blue theme) and Fuschia (a pink theme). They have also added two new languages – Malay and Urdu – to bring the number of available languages up to 44.

Users who have been experiencing problems with Swiftkey, including those with Samsung Galaxy S III devices, running Jelly Bean, or who frequently use Chrome will benefit from numerous bug fixes. The new version, Swiftkey 3.0.1, is available from Google Play, Amazon Appstore, and AndroidPIT. Hit the source link for more information on all of the bug fixes and a video on how to change themes.

source: Swiftkey
via: Android Police

Use Your Nexus 7 To Make And Receive Voice Calls Through Google Voice

XDA member bongostl has posted a step-by-step guide for modifying your Nexus 7, or any tablet for that matter, to enable outgoing and incoming calls through Google Voice. This requires the editing of system files, so your tablet needs to be rooted. What this method does is make the tablet think it’s voice capable, which allows dialer app voice+ to connect through Google Voice and place a call.

Incoming calls will be handled by any SIP app, such as CSipSimple, which requires you to also set up a call number and routing using other online services such as callcentric and ipkall. Couple all that with Google Voice, an edited and recompiled framework-res.apk file, and the flashing of an update.zip, and you’ve got yourself a really large tablet-phone in 16 quick and easy steps.

Or you can download GrooVe IP from the Play Store and skip all the rest.

Ok, that was snarky. To be fair, bongostl’s method has the advantage that you can still receive calls in your Gmail on your computer, whereas with GrooVe IP, it’s one or the other. But seriously, to me this all seems like way too much of a hassle with too many potential points of failure to really be worth it for most people.

Bottom line: Hackers and tweakers only. Everyone else just get GrooVe IP.

source: xda

Google Voice Deals With Anonymous Callers By Creating New Caller Groups

Don’t you hate it when you get a call and the number is “restricted” or “unknown”? It’s annoying because you know full well that it’s most likely spam calling. If you are a user of Google Voice, however, you can now get your sweet revenge on telemarketers everywhere with the introduction of two new customizable caller groups.

Basically, calls can now be divided into those in your address book (All Contacts), and those that are unknown (Anonymous Callers). The anonymous group is where you can have some fun by setting up a custom greeting that picks up after one ring. Use this message to tell anonymous callers just how you feel about them being… well… anonymous. Or, if you’re not in the mood to be creative, simply send them to voicemail directly and deal with them later. Awesome addition, Google.

source google voice blog

 

Google Eyeing Additional Carriers Besides Sprint For Google Voice Integration

For almost a year, Sprint has had the monopoly on full Google Voice integration. That monopoly may be in jeopardy. In an interview with CNET, Vincent Paquet, Group Product Manager for Google Voice, said “We are having discussions with other carriers about this,” but declined to mention which carriers.

Google Voice is a service that provides users with online and on-device visual voicemail, cheaper international calls, personalized greetings, text transcription, and more. Sprint’s integration allows Sprint customers to either replace their Sprint number with their Google Voice number, or replace their Google Voice number with their Sprint number without incurring the usual $20 porting fee (see screenshot after the break). Either way, users get full access to all of Google Voice’s features.


Read more

Google Voice App updated to offer voicemail integration in call log on ICS

 

The folks at Google have just released an update to the popular Google Voice app for ICS users everywhere. In the past, you would check the phone for missed calls, then open your Google Voice app and find the voicemail from the missed caller. Google has removed the middle step. Now, once you are in the call log, there will be an option to play the voicemail directly from the list of missed calls. Just another small detail that will make things run smoother and more efficiently during your daily activities. Thanks Google! Hit up the link to update your ICS Google Voice app.

source: Google Voice Blog

qrcode

Play Store Download Link

YouMail Update Includes One-Click Unwanted Call Blocking

Unsolicited, unwanted calls. We all get them. They are the spam of voice calls. If you use Google Voice, you can already block unwanted calls, but not everyone wants to port their number to GV. For those folks, there’s YouMail, a visual voicemail app that can use your own phone number as long as you forward unanswered calls to their service.

Today, YouMail has announced that the new versions of both their apps, YouMail and WhoAreYou, now support one-click blocking of calls from unwanted numbers. Blocking a number causes calls from that number to no longer be visible or ring the phone. On top of that, blocked callers will not be able to leave a message, and they receive a greeting that states the number is out of service. Out of service numbers tend to get removed from spammer call lists. Bonus!

Full presser and download links after the break.


Read more

GrooVe IP Lite – Make VoIP Calls For Free

GrooVe IP is an app that connects to your Google Voice account through Voice-Over-IP (VoIP) and allows you to make calls on your device using only a Wi-Fi connection. This saves you from using your carrier minutes, and also provides a great alternative when in an area that has Wi-Fi but no carrier signal.

Up until now, you had to shell out $4.99 in the Play Store for GrooVe IP. But developer snrb Labs has just released a “Lite” version of the app that is ad-supported and has most of the main features as the paid version, minus the following:

  • Calls over a mobile data connection not just WiFi
  • Native dialer integration
  • Proximity sensor support
  • Change sign in status or sign in invisible

Not too shabby. Screenshots and download link after the break.


Read more

Google+ Circles Now Available in Google Voice

A cool new feature has been added to Google Voice for users of Google+. You can now use your Circles as custom groups in your Google Voice account. What does that mean? Google Software Engineer Tom Ford explains it in his blog post:

To help make it even easier for you to organize your contacts, today we’re adding Google+ Circles to Google Voice. Circles give you more control over how you manage your callers; for example, calls from your “Creepers” circle can be sent straight to Voicemail, only your “College Buddies” circle will hear you rap your voicemail greeting, or you can set your “Family” circle to only ring your mobile phone.

All you have to do is log in to your Google Voice account and go to the Groups and Circles tab to see all your Google+ Circles. You can then edit each one to suit your needs for that group. Pretty simple and powerful. So do you have any Circles that need to always go directly to voice mail? Yeah, I thought so. Me too.


Read more