Teenagers use voice commands most often and really want to order pizza

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Teenagers use voice commands a lot and they really want to order pizza. That is just some of what Google found from its Mobile Voice Study. Google looked at 1,400 smartphone users and how they use voice commands from Google Search, Apple’s Siri, and Microsoft’s Cortana. Teenagers (ages 13-18) use voice commands every day while adults are more inclined to “feel tech savvy” because of it.

Here are some notes from the Mobile Voice Study:

  • 55% of teenagers in the United States use voice commands every day
  • 45% of adults feel geeky when using voice commands
  • 89% of teenagers and 85% of adults believe that voice commands will be “very common” in the future
  • 22% of teenagers use voice commands in the bathroom
  • 45% of teenagers selected “send me pizza” when told to “pick one thing you wish you could ask your phone to do for you”
  • Northeasterners are the most active group to use voice commands — 50% use it at least once per day


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Google Now bests Siri and Cortana in voice search

 

 

 

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According to a new study by digital Marketing consultant firm Stone Temple, Google Now‘s voice searches trump those of both Siri and Cortana. Stone Temple created some 3,086 different queries to compare all three of these search platform. Rather than being random each question was specifically designed to procure a full answer to the question asked. In those 3,086 queries Google Now returned twice as many enhanced results as the Apple voice assistant and three times that of Cortana, as you can see from the graph below


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Google Now brings in flight price monitoring card

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The capabilities of Google Now expands often. Today, we are finding out that the latest addition to Google Now is a card that monitors flight prices. It works with data found through Google Flight to track a particular flight’s prices. A card will appear when the price changes. Data from other sites is not yet available with this feature. So to take advantage of it, use Google Flight.

Via: Android Police

Google may be working on a smart assistant for enterprise with HP

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Google Now is one of Android’s killer features, but it pretty much only works for consumer purposes. For most people, that’s perfectly fine, but in Google’s eyes there is a huge, untapped market for a digital voice assistant for enterprise customers. According to a new report from The Information, Google may be working with HP to bring some type of Google Now for business onto smartphones.

The theory behind using Google Now in an enterprise is that it would be easy for an employee to use voice commands to check out company specific information like product inventory levels without having to manually search for and type things. It’s already easy to use Google Now to check the weather or sports scores, so it makes sense that if it could integrate into a business system, it could be a huge hit. If any company knows about business and enterprise systems, it’s definitely HP, so if this report is true Google picked a pretty solid partner.
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Google Now adds alternate flights after delays and cancellations

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It’s pretty annoying when your flight gets delayed, or even cancelled. It’s even more annoying trying to find an alternate flight to get to where you’re going.

But now, you won’t have to worry about it.

Google Now has added an “alternate flights” view after your flight has been delayed or cancelled, which is a pretty convenient addition to the service.

Source: Engadget

 

Google Search updated to version 3.6 with new app deep linking and hints of a hands free mode

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Google is pushing out an update to Google Search, bringing the app to version 3.6. This is a really minor update with the only visible change being the ability for developers to deep link app information through Android’s linking API. This basically means you’ll be able to be linked directly to content in another app, if you have it installed and the developer has implemented it within their own application.
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Siri and Google Now duke it out, which is better?

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The war between Android and iOS isn’t just about smartphone or tablet market share. How about Google Now vs Siri? Which is better? Well Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster conducted a study that answers the question.

He threw 800 questions at both apps, and half of them were asked indoors, while the other half was outdoors. The questions were about local information, commerce, navigation, general information, and OS command.


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You can now easily correct a misheard word in Google Now with “no I said” command

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Has Google Now ever misheard a word you meant to say?

Chances are, it has. Although the service is pretty damn accurate, it’s still a developing technology and has a ways to go before being perfect. Google knows its product isn’t perfect, and in addition to improving voice recognition in Google Search, it has now added a “no I said ___” command for when the app mishears something you said.


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Google Now voice media controls incoming

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It looks like some people are enjoying voice controls for media that is currently playing as part of Google Now. So far the only commands available are “Next Song” and “Stop”, but we can only assume more options like “pause” will be added when it’s officially released. It appears that only a a few people have it now which means the full rollout could happen within the next few weeks.

You can easily check to see if you have it. Just say “OK Google,  Next Song” and you will see the screenshot at the top left if the update has been pushed to your device. If not, you will see the top right screenshot and you will hear, “Media controls are not supported on this device.” It’s also weird that you need to tap your device in order to play the next song. Hopefully that will change.

You can see a video of this in action by jumping past the break.


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