Wearables Box by Lumoid lets you try 5 different wearables or rent Google Glass for $18

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More so than smartphones and tablets, wearables must truly walk the line between being fashionable as well as functional. Unless you’re both very patient and doing well for yourself financially, the process of finding that perfect wearable that compliments your personal style and gives you the information you want, can end up being a torturous lesson in frustration.

So Lumoid decided that they’d help you out by sending you a box of five wearables of your choosing and let you play with them for a week. If you like one or more of the devices, you can purchase them after you send the box back (so you’ll have a fresh unit and not one of the trial devices). If you didn’t like any of the five, you pay the relatively small amount of $20 USD. From there, you can try a different five or quit your quest altogether.
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Google Glass accessory will give you thermal vision

third_eye_picture1 As CES 2015 kicks into gear, companies will be throwing out press releases like Mardi Gras beads in order to draw attention to their products they plan on demoing at the show. One company, Round Concept LLC, has announced a rather interesting device that will be a side attachment to your Google spectacles. The purpose you ask? To give you thermal vision, brought straight to your Google Glasses’ visual overlay.

The attachment is called Third Eye, and the product will appear at Round Concept’s booth during the CES event. For more articles about the electronics show, click here for our full coverage of CES 2015 throughout the week. For further reading about Third Eye, click the “Read More” link below.
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Intel invests in smart-glasses maker Vuzix, now owns 30% of company

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On January 2nd, 2015, Intel and smart-glasses maker, Vuzix, announced that Intel had purchased 4,962,600 shares of Vuzix’ common stock. This gives Intel 30% control in the company and allows the placement of two board members to the current five. This development is interesting because earlier in December, Talk Android reported that Intel would be the chip supplier to Google’s next iteration of Google Glass.

Many market analysts made note that Intel was behind the curve in developing technology for mobile platforms, so these two announcements were perhaps related to that analysis.
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JINS MEME ‘Smart Eyewear’ coming to the U.S. in 2015

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Google Glass is still catching on despite being available for a couple of years. In the meantime, Japanese eyewear manufacturer JINS has decided to bring its MEME wearable to the U.S., with a showcase expected at next month’s CES event in Las Vegas. This Google Glass competitor will most likely be likely sold with a cheaper price tag, although the manufacturer hasn’t shared details on the pricing yet.
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Google files patent for redesigned and slimmer Google Glass

glass patentGoogle has filed for another patent for a redesigned version of Glass that shows off a much slimmer version than what you’ll get with the Explorer Edition today. This design fixes some of the problems of the original iteration of Glass, including a less bulky frame as well as a textured touch pad on the side.

While this patent shows a nice redesign of the hardware, it doesn’t mention anything about whether or not Google will actually begin shipping Glass with Intel processors like we’ve heard. If all of these rumors wind up being true, though, there’s a good chance we’ll finally see a slimmed down consumer release of Glass with a brand new, optimized CPU sometime next year, and hopefully it won’t cost $1,500 this time around.
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New version of Google Glass with Intel inside coming in 2015

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No Google Glass isn’t dead yet. It might take a while (if ever) to become a mainstream consumer device, but there is still a huge need at the enterprise level. According to the Wall Street Journal, Google will unveil an updated version of Glass with Intel inside, which replaces the current version’s Texas Instruments chip.

Google will also concentrate their efforts at the enterprise level with the new Glass at Work program. There is an obvious need in the medical field, as well as manufacturing and construction. Google Glass can provide information to those that are working with their hands and don’t have time to fumble around with a tablet or a smartphone. Software developers like Augmedix, Inc and APX Labs LLC are helping to bring Glass to these types of professions.


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Is Google Glass’ allure fading away?

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Just months ago, Google opened up the purchase of Glass to the public, but for the insane price of $1,500. Of course, the units are meant for developers only, but one might question when the prototype will hit its final stage and get released to the mass market for an affordable price.

According to a recent report by Reuters, the allure of Glass is starting to wear off — a miserable, miserable sign for Google, especially since the public hasn’t even gotten its hands on a finished product.


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