Humble Bundle 9 released with six titles

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Humble Bundle has announced the release of a new bundle of games, Humble Bundle: PC and Android 9. Like all Humble Bundles, buyers can select the price they want to pay and what the cut will be between charity and developers. For this bundle, four of the titles are included in the bundle no matter what. These include Broken Sword 2: The Smoking Mirror, Bridge Constructor, Type:Rider, and Ravensword: Shadowlands. If you pay more than the current average price, you also get Kingdom Rush and Knights of Pen & Paper +1 Edition as well as access to additional titles that Humble Bundle inevitably adds to these packages.
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Wikipad cuts $50 off its Android gaming tablet, drops to $199

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Wikipad 7, a 7-inch Android gaming tablet, received a price discount of $50 in the U.S bringing the cost from $249 down to $199. The gaming tablet comes pre-installed with popular titles such as Shadowgun: Deadzone and Dead Trigger 2. Other territories will soon announce a similar discount later.

In addition, the company has also unveiled a new game control mapping tool that will boost your gaming experience. The tool will allow you to map the touchscreen game controls to the controller. The 7-inch Android 4.2 tablet can also be detached from the controller making it suitable for non-gaming purposes as well.

Read the full press release after the break.
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Are in-app purchases for free-to-play games effective?

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We have all come across games with in-app purchases, and I often wonder if it’s really all that effective. I don’t mind spending money on any app or game if it’s worth it, but when a developer designs a game that forces you to pay for something to succeed in the game, I have a problem with that. I would rather the developer give me a demo of the game for free with an option to purchase the full version or the remaining levels for a one time purchase. In-app purchases remind me of the 1-900 days in which they tried to lure lonely men into coughing a bunch of dollars and getting nothing in return. Why should I buy a special red ship that has more fire power? Let me earn it the old fashioned way.

According to a survey conducted by Swrve, it appears as though the majority of people aren’t falling for this trap. According to them, only 0.15 percent of mobile gamers contribute 50 percent of all of the in-app purchases. These people are referred to as “Whales”, but I have another name for them that probably wouldn’t be a good idea to say.


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Google Developer Day planned as part of Game Developers Conference 2014

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Greg Hartrell with the Google Play Games team is inviting Android game developers to a special Google Developer Day as part of the larger conference. The Developer Day will be held on March 18th when teams from Google will be on hand to “share their insights on the best ways to build games, grow audiences, engage players and make money.” Hartrell highlights some of the sessions to be held, including:
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Flappy Bird is gone because you were too addicted to it

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You rarely, if ever, see an app get so popular that the developer voluntarily pulls it, but that’s exactly what happened to Flappy Bird. We were lead to believe that Dong Nguyen, the developer of the game, just wanted to go back to living a simple life, but he took a different direction in a recent interview with Forbes. According to Doug, you were only supposed to play the game a few minutes here and there, but you got addicted to it. So the only way to fix the problem was to delete it from the Play Store and iOS App Store.

“Flappy Bird was designed to play in a few minutes when you are relaxed, but it happened to become an addictive product. I think it has become a problem. To solve that problem, it’s best to take down Flappy Bird. It’s gone forever.”


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Google Glass gets five new Mini-Games to help inspire developers

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Google has released five mini-games for Google Glass devices to help inspire developer’s to think about gaming with the devices. The titles are all rather simplistic and harken back to the early days of video gaming with basic graphics and game play. They do showcase how Glass can be used to involve a user in the gameplay experience. With time, developers should be able to greatly improve gaming with Google Glass, especially if the major gaming studios tie them in to titles on the major gaming platforms to provide an additional screen of information.
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MOJO Android-powered gaming system rooted, given Google Play access

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Mad Catz’s Android-powered MOJO gaming console has been successfully rooted, and as a result, users will be able to access the Google Play Store, as well as thousands of other applications.

It obviously involves flashing a custom boot image using your computer (no overwriting the existing ROM), so be careful if you don’t have any rooting experience.


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Huawei takes a stab at the Android video game console market with Tron mini-console

Huawei Tron console

Android video game consoles are a popular trend lately as we’ve seen with the OUYA console and the Mad Catz MOJO console. And of course, anything that’s worth doing is worth overdoing, so Huawei is going to throw their hat in the ring with their latest mini console titled Tron. It’ll run a slightly tweaked version of Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and Huawei’s own digital store for content. That probably means no Play Store, unfortunately.

The actual hardware isn’t bad, with a Tegra 4 CPU, 2 GB of RAM and standard WiFi radios. The Tron will be available in 16 and 32 GB storage variants, as well as black and white color schemes. The console itself is cylindrical and looks pretty basic with no LEDs or anything. The controller sticks out the most looking like an Xbox 360 controller with a touchpad crammed between the buttons. That touchpad will likely come in handy when trying to play touch-screen only games, though, so you can’t fault Huawei for trying.
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Hands on with the Archos GamePad 2 at CES

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Last year at CES, Archos showed off their GamePad tablet device. It was a pretty unique tablet-hybrid, but it wasn’t without faults. This year, Archos has brought a much improved GamePad 2 to CES that improves a number of things to create a really great Android gaming experience.

The device runs a quad-core CPU with a Mali 400 GPU and 2 GB of RAM for excellent performance, and the 7 inch screen has a 1280 x 800 resolution for crisp details. The gaming buttons on the device have been polished and improved with the GamePad 2, and Archos has included a handful of new software tweaks and improvements. Overall, it looks like a great follow-up to the original GamePad. You can check out our hands on video below to see it in action.

Be sure to keep up with the rest of our coverage at CES this year.
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Featured Android Game Review: Farm Fest [Arcade & Action]

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If you’re looking for a simple and fun game, HeroCraft’s Farm Fest might be a good choice. It’s very reminiscent of Farm Frenzy, but I think this one has a little better graphics. In this game, you will build up your farm by raising animals and processing the produce (eggs,hams, etc.). You will also have to avoid roving boars to maximize your sales. You earn money by delivering the processed goods in the nearby city.

If you like puzzle/management games, you will find this one easy to play. HeroCraft explains in detail what you need to do (collecting product, processing, and delivering) at each level. It quickly becomes more difficult as wild boars try to take out your animals, but thankfully you can hire a dog to fend them off.


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