Android 5.0.2 factory image for Nexus 7 (2012) is available

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Have the 2012 model of the Nexus 7? Then go ahead and install the latest version of Android. On the Android Developers site, Google posted the Android 5.0.2 factory image for people that like doing things themselves. The factory image posted, though, is only for the WiFi variant (“nakasi”) and Google has yet to post any Lollipop factory images for the mobile data-enabled variant (“nakasig”). The Android 5.0.2 factory image is build LRX22G.

New to the whole process of installing a factory image? We put together guide with plenty of details so you can do it easily.

[Factory Image Link]

Android 5.0.1 factory images now posted for Nexus 5

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The Android 5.0.1 update for a variety of Nexus devices has been rolling out to several devices since earlier this month. As is par for the course, Google’s developers have also posted factory images for different devices that can be used by those unwilling to wait for the OTA or who may need to restore their device to a factory condition. Joining the list of devices with a downloadable image available is the Nexus 5.

If you need to grab the image, you can hit the source link below and find the appropriate file for your Nexus 5 device. If the instructions provided by the Google developers seem a little daunting, you may want to check out TalkAndroid’s guide to installing a Lollipop factory image on your device without losing your data.

source: Google Developers

Nexus 7, Nexus 9, and Nexus 10 get Android 5.0.1 factory images

google_nexus_9_screensIf you own a Nexus tablet, you might want to check out Google’s latest factory image page. The WiFi versions of the 2013 Nexus 7, Nexus 9, and brand new Nexus 10 all have official factory images for Android 5.0.1 available to flash. This should be the start of a gradual rollout to all Nexus devices, but the tablets are getting the first crack at the incremental update.

If you need help installing the factory images on your device, you can find our guide here.
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Want an updated factory image of Android L Dev Preview? Not gonna happen, a Googler says

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If you’re one of the many who jumped ship from their stable Android version to try out the Android L Developer Preview, you definitely noticed it’s not exactly the most polished thing in the world (not even close, actually).

No reason to be mad at Google, though — it’s just a developer preview, and we’re lucky to have something before launch.

As most Android enthusiasts tend to do, we looked ahead, and hoped for Google to upload an updated factory image of the L Developers Preview. But according to Googler Rich Hyndman, it ain’t happening.


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Verizon’s Nexus 7 LTE update Binaries and Factory Image released

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Earlier this week, the Nexus 7 LTE received an update that allows “full compatibility with Verizon’s 4G LTE network” . Google has now released a factory image and three binary files for it labeled as Android 4.4.2 build KVT49L .

The software image contains a new edition of the baseband radio, while the binary files bring more complete compatibility with various hardware components such as Audio and Sensors from Asus, NFC from  Broadcom and Graphics, Camera and other components by Qualcomm. The factory image lets you restore your Nexus 7 LTE back to the latest stock Android firmware. The factory image and binaries are most useful to developers who want to create a custom ROM for the Nexus 7.
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Google posts binaries and factory image for new Nexus 7, including controversial Qualcomm files

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Since officially releasing the Nexus 7 (2013), Google’s latest device has been receiving positive reviews in general. However, some issues have come up, like some GPS problems that Google is aware of and is working on a solution. Another problem that surfaced that has the potential to impact Android fans beyond those who own the new Nexus 7 have been issues revolving around the release of Qualcomm binaries for the device. The issue was so contentious, that Jean Baptiste-Queru went so far as to submit his resignation and walk away from the AOSP project due to the difficulties in getting factory images released. Apparently the bad press related to that was more than Google could fathom as they have now released the factory image and binaries, including the Qualcomm files in question.
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Nexus 7 tablet experiencing difficulties in getting factory images available for the masses, causing Jean Baptiste-Queru to give up and leave AOSP all together

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As excited as we are about the ushering of the new Nexus 7 tablet, there have been some quiet— but major technical snafus for the Android hardcore which has resulted in one of the most important pieces of the AOSP disappearing from the project all together. Tech stud Jean Baptiste-Queru officially confirmed the various rumors regarding his AOSP position and thus, confirmed that he was leaving everything all together because of his frustration with the difficulty of getting factory images for the newest Google tablet. Check out the following for his reasoning:

 

Well, I see that people have figured out why I’m quitting AOSP.

 

There’s no point being the maintainer of an Operating System that can’t boot to the home screen on its flagship device for lack of GPU support, especially when I’m getting the blame for something that I don’t have authority to fix myself and that I had anticipated and escalated more than 6 months ahead.

 

The reasoning is certainly legit, but what’s really eye-opening is the part where he talks about a Google flagship device not being able to boot to the home screen because of the lack of GPU support. Android purists will recall that the Nexus 4— which also features a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip— originally didn’t have the factory image and source code released in full. Naturally the issues were addressed, but owners of the device weren’t able to enjoy the true Nexus experience since the source code/factory images couldn’t be modified. Now we’re going through the same exact issue as the Snapdragon-powered Nexus 7 doesn’t have the factory images available to the masses. Is it a coincidence that both devices that two Snapdragon-based Nexus devices have had factory image issues? Probably— but one thing’s definitely for sure: it’s certainly going to suck not having Jean Baptiste Queru for our AOSP needs. Hopefully the Android team will find some sort of fix or remedy for future Nexus devices.

source: Android and me

Google pulls Nexus 4 factory images and binaries from its developers site

 

Some hawk-eyed hackers noticed something strange this morning: the factory images for the Nexus 4 seem to have disappeared from Google’s developer site. A factory image is a file that allows you to restore your device completely to stock in case something goes wrong while hacking and tinkering with your device. Interestingly, the Nexus 7, Nexus 10, and Galaxy Nexus factory images are all still available to download, indicating that the Nexus 4 factory images were deliberately pulled by Google to make some changes to the core code. Could it be that Google is trying to completely disable the recently discovered 4G antenna? We hope not. It’s anyone’s guess really, what Google is up to. Anyone have any good theories?

Source: Google Developers

Google makes Jelly Bean factory images available for Verizon Galaxy Nexus

Developers or others who enjoy flashing their phones have a nice new option available if they have a Verizon Galaxy Nexus smartphone. After starting the process of rolling out a Jelly Bean update to Verizon users earlier this week, the factory images are now available on the Google Developers site for download. Listed as version JRO03O, the file can be used to restore a Galaxy Nexus to factory state. Even if you are not inclined to flash your Galaxy Nexus for fun, you can always keep a copy of the image as a fail-safe in case something really bad happens with your phone.

source: Google Developers