Google announces first batch of Android apps compatible with Chrome OS

android_apps_chromebook

In June, Google emphasized that Android is now powerful enough to operate devices in many different form factors due to its versatility. Today, the company is announcing the first batch of Android apps capable of being used on a Chrome OS device. The apps now compatible with a Chromebook (or any other Chrome OS device) are Duolingo, Evernote, Sight Words, and Vine.

A project called App Runtime for Chrome (Beta) makes this all possible. What is on an Android device can be seamlessly ported over to a bigger, more expansive display. In the coming months, Goole will be working with additional developers to bring their apps over to Chrome OS.

Source: Google Chrome Blog

Amazon discounts Chromebooks for back to school sale

Acer Chromebook C720 rear view half closed

Google has positioned Chromebooks as an excellent laptop to choose for educational purposes, and so far, they’ve sold fairly well. If you’ve been thinking about picking one up, you’re definitely going to want to check out Amazon’s pretty big sale on Chromebooks and Chromeboxes for back to school. Some models are seeing around $20 – $40 price drops, but others, like the HP 11-inch Chromebook, have dropped about $80 down to $199.
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Microsoft planning on launching ultra-cheap laptops to compete with Chromebooks

microsoft chromebook comparison

One of Microsoft’s biggest threats has been Google’s Chromebook line. Chromebooks have been relatively cheap and functional, primarily using the Chrome web browser for “apps.” Since Google doesn’t charge high licensing fees for Chrome OS, and they’ve marketed the simplicity and virus-immunity heavily against traditional Windows laptops, Chromebooks have been steadily eating Microsoft’s laptop market share from the bottom up.
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Low-end processor support indicates that Chromebooks can get even cheaper

toshiba_chromebook_press_image

Thought $199 was cheap for a Chromebook? Or how about $179 for a Chromebox? Get ready, because the race to the bottom for a Chrome OS device has not even started. Found within the code for the backbone of Chrome OS is support for a low-end processor with the source being MediaTek. Low-end means that the prices would drop; however, do know that performance would also drop. Currently, there are Chromebooks out there that experience problems with multiple tabs being opened at once. That is why Intel stepped forward to support the operating system with quality processors at decent price points. That company has backed Chromebooks with its Bay Trail, Celeron, and Haswell processors.

Source: Chromium
Via: Engadget

Google Play for Education expands its availability to Chromebooks

google_play_for_education

When Google Play for Education was announced last year at Google I/O, the focus was get tablets into the classroom due to their approachability. Fast forward to this year’s Google I/O and now Google Play for Education is bringing Chromebooks into the fold. Chromebooks are already being used across the country in many school districts due to their pricing, security, and simplicity. Google received feedback from many teachers feeling that having Chromebooks could open the door to an easier way to find content. For K-12 Chromebook schools, Google Play for Eduction is now available.
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Chromebooks to include new security unlock features, new Google Now cards, and run Android apps

chromebook unlock

Sundar Pichai took the stage again at Google I/O to let us know what Google has up its sleeves for Chromebooks and Chrome OS.

Today, Google has 8 OEMs making 15 different Chromebook devices (with more coming), available in 28 different countries.

Pichai even noted that all 10 of the top 10 rated laptops on Amazon are all Chromebooks. Not too shabby. There’s even been a 6x growth of use of Chromebooks in K-12 schools in the past year.

Google will be adding more to Chromebooks and the Chrome OS in order to make sure these trends continue.


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Chrome OS adds support for “supervised users,” allows for stronger control over alternate user accounts

Supervised User

Multi-user support on Android tablets is a very attractive feature, allowing administrators to create accounts for others who live in their homes, and even restrict access to specific apps/settings on those alternate accounts.

Now, Google will be bringing a similar feature to Chrome OS, called “Supervised Users.” Chromebook and Chromebox owners will be able to set up secondary accounts on their Chrome OS devices. These secondary accounts will not require an associated Google account, and the administrator will be able to view the supervised users’ browsing history and put limits on web surfing.

Source: +Francois Beaufort

 

Got a Chromebook? Got pics? Good news. Auto-sync to Google+ is now live

Chromebook

If you’re a Chromebook user with lots of pictures to store, don’t fret.

When you connect your phone/tablet, camera or storage card to your Chromebook, your photos will now be automatically stored to Google+ Photos. Of course the photos will be set to private, so don’t worry about “my eyes only” pics getting out for “other eyes.”


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