Cablevision customers can now control their TV with new Optimum app (if your device is compatible)

by Alexon Enfiedjian on
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In our smartphone saturated society, more and more companies are releasing apps that allow your smartphone to control their hardware. Today cable television provider Cablevision jumped on the bandwagon and released their new Optimum app which allows subscribers to control their TVs and even stream shows directly to their devices via the app. Besides being able to control your DVR box, schedule recordings, and stream shows, watch on-demand movies, there is also a useful channel guide built in with the ability to search for shows by name or category. You even have the option to rate programs after you’ve watched them. According to the Cablevision’s site, to use the app you’ll need to be connected to your home network through an “Optimum authorized modem”.

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Verizon’s Wireless Pay-TV Plan

by Ed Caggiani on
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Verizon is looking to provide its customers with a wireless video service this year. They are in discussions with television programmers to prepare even before getting FCC and DOJ approval for the $3.9 billion purchase of spectrum from cable operators. “Technically, I think we could have something out that would be the beginnings of an integrated offering in time for the holidays,” said Verizon CEO Lowell C. McAdam to the Wall Street Journal.

This service would allow pay-TV customers to take their TV watching mobile. There are already many streaming TV services available, but most are limited to Wi-Fi access. McAdam says the potential to negotiate outside-the-home streaming rights exist, as well as the opportunity for à la carte programming.

The cost of this service is still a question mark, but be prepared for a consumption-based approach rather than an all-you-can-stream plan. It is also not known how, or if, the Redbox deal enters into this.

source: wsj
via: engadget

RCA Shows Android on TV, not Google TV

by Jesse Bauer on
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rcaandroidtv1

RCA showed off its new TV line and demo’d Android OS running on one of its TV models. This is a prototype due out later in 2011, but of course, like all good technology, it’s seen at CES in Las Vegas. The only downfall reported with this demo is the lack of Android Apps shown other than the typical Picasa and YouTube apps seen in the video over at Engadget. With the struggle to get into the cable market with internet TV such as Google TV and Apple TV, it surprising that RCA would decide to jump in this market with Android OS, but i guess that’s the beauty of open-source projects…you don’t need permission.

[via Engadget]

Verizon CEO Says 4G LTE Can Replace Cable Broadband Services

by Jesse Bauer on
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Verizon’s CEO Ivan Seidenberg mentioned at an investor conference that he imagines Verizon’s 4G LTE network to be a “modest substitute” to the home broadband internet and cable services. Even more hilarious about this right now is that he also imagines regular customer data usage to be around 10GB a month.

I know I use a lot more than 10GB a month on home internet and cable, especially with new services like Google TV, Netflix and Apple TV coming out, all offering HDTV over broadband. That’s a lot of data usage. I wouldn’t go cutting my cable cords just yet if you’re in areas that support it, but I’d be interested if I were in an area that had no cable to my door, and I could use 4G then.

I’m sure once 4G LTE is rolling for most carriers next year, pricing will be a bit more realistic.

[via Engadget]

Sony to simplify inner-phone cabling, replacing multiple cables with single copper wire

by Dustin Karnes on
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Have you ever cracked open a cell phone? If you have, chances are that you have seen all the cabling involved on the inside: Specific ribbon cables and wires, all responsible for any assortment of data transmission, from display to sound and everything in between.

Now, Sony is looking to simplify your phone’s guts by replacing all of that with a single copper wire, that they state will not only handle all that information through that single pipe, but will transmit the information at 940Mbps. As phones become thinner and more transportable, you can bet that this type of technology will play a huge role in new device development and manufacturing.

[via Sony]