Sony Xperia Z3, Z2, and Z3 get AOSP version of Lollipop

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In the image above, you are looking at a version of Android 5.0 Lollipop running on select Sony devices. It is the AOSP version of the operating system’s latest version shown on a Xperia Z3, Xperia Z2, and even the Xperia Z1. Owners of those devices (unlocked) can go ahead and check it out.

The Xperia Z Series is scheduled to receive an official version of Android 5.0 Lollipop from Sony in early 2015. In Sweden, though, Sony has the 3Beta program that allows Xperia Z3 and Xperia Z3 Compact owners to test drive Sony’s Lollipop software ahead of everyone else. This allows the company to understand how its software is performing in reality.


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Google adds Android 5.0 Lollipop to the AOSP

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The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) is on its way to to run the latest version of Android. Google is updating the AOSP with Android 5.0 Lollipop. The repositories for the Nexus 6, Nexus 9, and Nexus Player are available alongside previous Nexus devices like the Nexus 7 (2013). If a Nexus device is missing, it is either because Google has yet to successfully upload the repositories for it or it is not going to get Lollipop.

This will give developers a chance to start working with the operating system for custom ROMs.

Source: Google

Android M chatter starting before L has been released

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To some, Android L is already old news. Google engineers discussing things on the Android Open Source Project thread mention an upcoming version of Android multiple times. Unsurprisingly, the said version was called Android M. This follows Google’s alphabetical order for labeling Android versions.

We have yet to find out Android L’s sweet name, but that does not stop anyone from speculating Android M’s. Names being tossed around right now include mint and marshmallow. If Google wanted to go with the branded route, like KitKat, they could target Milky Way or Mallomars.

What do you think Android M should be called?

Source: Myce

Kernel source files for LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live released by Google

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Google, via the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), has made the official kernel files for the Samsung Gear Live and LG G Watch available for download. This is good news for developers who want to work on developing custom ROMs for the devices or fine tune apps to take full advantage of the platform. Being smartwatch devices, this should also help those developers who want to create unique watch faces for the devices.

In releasing the code, Bill Yi on the Android Building Google Group indicated the development team is planning a “full platform push” for the next version of Android, currently dubbed Android L.

If you want to grab the source, hit the source link below.

AOSP

Google posts Android L preview source code for various Nexus devices

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The preview of Android L can now be tried on additional Nexus devices. Last week at Google I/O, the source code was made available for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) while others were left out. Google has added the Nexus 7 (2012), Nexus 10, and Nexus 4 to the Android L preview. Older Nexus devices like the Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S are obviously being left behind due to age.

Hit the break for individual links to each device.
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[Video] Paranoid Android team introduces ‘Hover’ feature in their ROM

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The Paranoid Android team have always been in the forefront when it comes to adding some awesome features into their AOSP based ROM’s. With previous features like Halo, you can expect the team to always come up with interesting features. Today they’ve released their newly developed feature, dubbed as “Hover,” into their beta builds, and so far I think it looks amazing and very practical. The video below can give you a much better idea of what it is than me explaining it, so check it out after the break and let us know what you think about it! Just remember that it’s still in beta so don’t be surprised to find some bugs if you decide t give it a shot.


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Google’s Patch Reward Program adds numerous open source software projects

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Approximately six weeks ago, Google launched a new program it was calling the Patch Reward Program. The program encourages coders to take a proactive approach to improve “third-party” software that Google believes is key to the health of the Internet. According to Google:

“The goal is very simple: to recognize and reward proactive security improvements to third-party open-source projects that are vital to the health of the entire Internet.”
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Jean-Baptiste Queru surfaces at Yahoo!

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Jean-Baptiste Queru, aka JBQ, who was the lead for Google’s Android Open Source Project, announced via a tweet that he is now working at Yahoo! with the team developing their mobile apps. You may recall last month, after the release of the Nexus 7 2013, that JBQ became extremely frustrated with the inability to get factory images thanks to hesitancy on the part of Qualcomm in releasing their binaries. That frustration led to JBQ walking away from Google and the AOSP. That in turn appears to have triggered Google and Qualcomm to resolve the issues and post the factory images, though apparently too late to retain one of their leads.

JBQ indicates he started in his new position as an architect and senior principal engineer this week.

source: @jbqueru
via: AllThingsD

Android 4.3 for Nexus 10 still isn’t supported in AOSP due to GPU driver issues

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Remember those issues with the Nexus 7 factory images that couldn’t be released because of proprietary graphic drivers? Unfortunately, the Nexus 10 seems to be running into a few of the same problems. The GPU binaries are unable to be released to AOSP which prevents developers from building Android 4.3 from source for the Nexus 10. Factory images are still available, but the source-builds are going to be held up by those GPU drivers and binaries.

Jean-Baptiste Queru confirmed the issues on a Google product forum and stated that only Android 4.2.2 could be built for the Nexus 10 until these drivers were released. Until then, a factory image is your best option if you want to tinker around with what Google has available for their flagship 10 inch tablet.

source: Google Developers

Google Forums

via: Android Police

Nexus 7 tablet experiencing difficulties in getting factory images available for the masses, causing Jean Baptiste-Queru to give up and leave AOSP all together

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As excited as we are about the ushering of the new Nexus 7 tablet, there have been some quiet— but major technical snafus for the Android hardcore which has resulted in one of the most important pieces of the AOSP disappearing from the project all together. Tech stud Jean Baptiste-Queru officially confirmed the various rumors regarding his AOSP position and thus, confirmed that he was leaving everything all together because of his frustration with the difficulty of getting factory images for the newest Google tablet. Check out the following for his reasoning:

 

Well, I see that people have figured out why I’m quitting AOSP.

 

There’s no point being the maintainer of an Operating System that can’t boot to the home screen on its flagship device for lack of GPU support, especially when I’m getting the blame for something that I don’t have authority to fix myself and that I had anticipated and escalated more than 6 months ahead.

 

The reasoning is certainly legit, but what’s really eye-opening is the part where he talks about a Google flagship device not being able to boot to the home screen because of the lack of GPU support. Android purists will recall that the Nexus 4— which also features a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip— originally didn’t have the factory image and source code released in full. Naturally the issues were addressed, but owners of the device weren’t able to enjoy the true Nexus experience since the source code/factory images couldn’t be modified. Now we’re going through the same exact issue as the Snapdragon-powered Nexus 7 doesn’t have the factory images available to the masses. Is it a coincidence that both devices that two Snapdragon-based Nexus devices have had factory image issues? Probably— but one thing’s definitely for sure: it’s certainly going to suck not having Jean Baptiste Queru for our AOSP needs. Hopefully the Android team will find some sort of fix or remedy for future Nexus devices.

source: Android and me