A hitchhiker’s guide to the best free and paid Android music streaming apps

Most people that own a smartphone also use their phone to double as an mp3 player. It might not be the primary use of the phone, but it’s a popular feature nonetheless. If you only listen to just a little bit of music, storing all of your music locally on internal storage or an SD card is usually a quick, simple solution. But if you have a large music collection or perhaps your device lacks storage or an SD card slot, storing it all locally may not be an option. Like with all things Android, though, there’s always an alternative! In this case, most heavy music listeners opt for music streaming. The market for music streaming is pretty crowded, however, so the point of this guide is to walk you through some of the more popular options and choose which streaming service is the right option for you. Hit the break to find out more.
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Amazon Cloud Player (Amazon MP3 app) launches in the UK

We all know that Amazon is a major player in the U.S. on numerous fronts, and the Amazon Cloud Player certainly counts as one. The Cloud Player, as you may know, provides the ability to upload music to Amazon’s servers allowing playback on a device without taking up precious storage space on the device. However, while we’ve been enjoying this service in the U.S. for a while now, the rest of the world has been shut out. That is, up until now – at least in the UK.


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Amazon Upgrading its Cloud Player to Compete with iTunes Match and Google Music

Today Amazon has announced they will be pushing some serious upgrades to their popular Cloud Player music streaming platform. The intention is to make the service more competitive with Apple’s ‘iTunes Match’ and Google Music.

Starting with the addition of scan and match technology, the service will scan customers’ iTunes and Windows Media Player libraries, then match the songs on their computers to Amazon’s catalog of music, which includes a stunning 20 million tracks and rising.

All matched music will immediately be accessible via Cloud Player and upgraded for free to high-quality 256Kbps audio. This includes music customers bought from iTunes, ripped from CDs or that was bought from Amazon. Better accessibility will be a driving factor in making Amazon Cloud Player more popular. For example, any customer with an Android device, iDevice, Kindle Fire, or even a web browser will have access to all their music via the cloud. Those of you with Roku and Sonos home entertainment systems will soon have support as well.
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Microsoft’s Woodstock Xbox Music Service Will Run On Android

We don’t normally do stories about Microsoft on TalkAndroid, but there’s a rumor going around about a new streaming music service coming from Redmond codenamed “Woodstock” that could run on Android, iOS, and Windows Phone. The service will likely stream music through the phone’s browser, but there is no mention of a native app. This is unfortunate since native apps tend to be more streamlined and responsive than browser-based services.

Supposedly, Woodstock will be closer to Spotify with the ability to identify music you already own, a la  iTunes Match. This suggests it will not be simply a music locker-type service like Amazon MP3 or Google Music, but it is unclear exactly how it will work.

It’s great to see more competition in the music streaming space, but until we get more details about Woodstock, it’s impossible to judge how it will stand up against the other services out there. In my opinion, services that are seamlessly built into an ecosystem will almost always be the better choice than a third party option simply because of the convenience and level of integration possible. The operative word there is “almost” since I can think of examples where the third party option wins (think Netflix vs. Google Movies).

Look for Woodstock announcements at this year’s E3, which starts June 5.

source: theverge
via: pocketnow

5.9.902 Update for the DROID Bionic Heading to Testers

The DROID Bionic, the phone to rule all phones, came out with some pretty big bugs. Some of the bigger bugs included the 3G/4G signal issue, and even the whine that some users were complaining of. Well it was roughly 3 months after the fact that the phone received its first major bug fix and since then the folks at Motorola and Verizon have been cranking out the bug fixes.The mysterious update that came out a week after the major bug fix appears to have been a test build somehow released to the public and the new build going out to testers today only adds a few more changes on top of 5.9.901. This update that brings the software version to 5.9.902 includes the fixes in that mysterious 5.9.901 update and adds the following:
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