New “Know My App” site tells which data-hungry apps to watch out for

know_my_appWhile carriers usually warn you when you’re getting close to your data limit, they don’t tell you what you can do to avoid reaching that cap. A CTIA-run website called “Know My App” aims to fix that. “Know My App” shows the typical data consumption of popular mobile apps and compares it against capped US wireless plans. The site then tells Android and iOS users which apps use a large amount of data, and which are more cap-friendly. You can browse through the most popular apps, or search through a large list by name to see which apps to avoid to stay under your limit.

Source: Know My App
Via: BGR

 

2014 isn’t looking to good for LG, HTC, and Huawei

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As Samsung and Apple continue to dominate the smartphone market share, other companies like LG and HTC continue to slide. LG was hopeful the G2 would put a dent into Samsung’s armor, but consumers didn’t buy in. According to DigiTimes, LG projected to sell 10 million units, but so far they have only reached 2 million globally. HTC, on the other hand, has gotten a lot of praise for their HTC One, but their financial results continued to slide throughout 2013. Huawei might be in the best position of the three, but even they aren’t doing so well. They were hoping to sell 10 million Ascend P6 smartphones, but they only reached 3 million.

Motorola wasn’t mentioned in their report, but there might be hope for them with the very reasonably priced Moto G, and if they continue to sell the Moto X at lower prices.

The bottomline is that there really isn’t room for more than 2 or 3 flagship phones. Consumers like to stay loyal, and they don’t have the attention span to learn about “other” so-called up and coming phones.

source: DigiTimes

Motorola Moto G headed for Boost Mobile according to leaked render

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When Motorola launched the Moto G, part of their goal was to put a capable smartphone in the hands of buyers not interested in the power of a top-tier smartphone. It makes sense then that Motorola would look for opportunities to place the device with carriers that target deal-hunting consumers. That appears to be the case with the latest press render that leaked according to Twitter tipster @evleaks who discovered an image of the Moto G sporting a wallpaper adorned with Boost Mobile logos.

Currently the Moto G is only available on the AT&T and T-Mobile networks thanks to its limitation to GSM. However, Verizon announced they would carry the Moto G on their prepaid network starting sometime in early 2014. Making the device available on Boost Mobile, which utilizes Sprint’s network, makes sense since Motorola is preparing a CDMA based version. This would also somewhat mirror the strategy Motorola used when it released the Moto X in offering exclusive Moto Maker capabilities to AT&T customers first with other carriers getting it at a later date.

source: @evleaks

Sapphire to be incorporated into manufacturing of flagship smartphones in 2014

HTC Onea

Sapphire isn’t just for jewelry, folks. HTC and LG could begin using sapphire in its smartphones’ home buttons to implement fingerprint scanning devices into their 2014 flagship devices— these devices are of course the HTC One 2, and the LG G3.

There isn’t much more information regarding the fingerprint scanners, but we do know they will be there— the only hope is that they’ll be a tad bit better than the scanner on the latest iPhone.

Source: DigiTimes

Snapchat security issue has not been addressed since its discovery in August, could pose serious privacy concerns for users

snapchat_update

Gibson Security has found a security issue in Snapchat, the popular photo/video messaging platform, which could allow hackers to easily exploit the program’s API to steal data, as well as scam/stalk Snapchat users.

The security team had presented the issues to Snapchat in August and says that they still have not been addressed, and warn that they pose serious privacy risks for users.

Phone numbers of users can easily be discovered, and dummy accounts can be created in bulk. The code of the exploit is now available to the public, so pretty much anyone with any hacking experience could exploit it. Gibson Security says that the bug can be fixed with “ten lines of code.”

Via: Engadget
Source: Gibson Security
 

TalkAndroid Daily Dose for December 26, 2013

TalkAndroid_Daily_Dose

With hectic schedules, it can be hard to keep track of everything in your news feed. That’s why we created the TalkAndroid Daily Dose. This is where we recap the day’s hottest stories so you can get yourself up to speed in quick fashion. Happy reading!!

Chromecast

Plex launches new website, offers option to stream to Chromecast

Google

Google fights back, sues Apple and Microsoft backed Rockstar patent troll

Phones

Mock-up of HTC One sequel gives away specs

LG G3 specs get leaked

Read more