How to set up Google Allo on the web

It’s here! Finally, after months of waiting, Google is letting you use Allo on your computer. It means you can easily switch between phones, tablets, and computers without losing a single message from any conversation.

First let’s note that Allo for web is currently exclusive for Android users. If you use Allo on an iOS device, you’ll have to wait. Google is rolling out support for Apple’s hardware at a later time. And, no, the update for web access doesn’t include SMS/MMS support. Despite focusing heavily on Allo in 2017, Google doesn’t feel that adding the most-requested feature is a priority yet. So we’re not actually sure who’s using Allo in any capacity today.

Anyway, let’s get Allo syncing between devices.

1. From your computer, visit g.co/alloforweb using Chrome as the web browser. It’ll display a QR code. This is what’s going to link together your the Allo account between your computer and your Android device.

2. Take out your phone (or tablet), and open the Allo app. Swipe from the left to expand the slide-out menu. Now there’s a new option with today’s update. It reads “Allo for web.” After selecting it, Allo will tell you you’re about to scan for a QR code. Point your phone at the QR code on your computer once you hit the “Scan QR Code” button. The two will instantly sync and the Allo app will show a management screen.

3. Your computer, meanwhile, will take a moment to load all of your conversations on Allo. And that’s it. Both your phone and your computer are ready to seamlessly handle everything you do with Google’s artificial intelligence-based messaging platform.


If you need help, let us know in the comments section. We’ll see what we can do.


About the Author: Justin Herrick

Born and raised in New Jersey, Justin is a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University where he studied marketing with a focus on digital marketing. He's very talkative and enjoys discussing anything from technology and sports to video games and television. As for Justin's current device rotation, he carries around the Google Pixel and Nexus 9. In the rare case that his phone or tablet is not in his hand, he is either flicking through cards on his Moto 360 (2015) or typing away on the Microsoft Surface Book. Justin is patiently waiting for the day that Google replicates the Galaxy Nexus with modern day specifications.