Crafty Gamer Cleverly Mounts Samsung Galaxy Note To A Playstation 3 Controller, Oh And The Controls Are Fully Functional

One of the great things about Android devices is that well, you get to modify them and put them through unusual jobs, such as putting it to use as a topnotch gaming device. Okay, so many of you are looking perplexed, so let me explain: a crafty Galaxy Note owner realized the 5.3-inch screen of the device is too good to not be taken advantage of when it comes to gaming. So in having some time on his hands, the crafty developer went ahead and did the unthinkable— he literally gathered ports of popular games like Mario on his Galaxy Note, created an attachment terminal mount on his Playstation 3 controller, mounted his Galaxy Note to the controller and successfully configured the setup to allow his PS3 controller control the games. Impressive isn’t it?

Don’t take my word for it— check out the cool achievement in all its glory once you hit past the break.


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Olympus announces MEG4.0 wearable display prototype, perhaps their version of Google Glass?

It seems as if Google isn’t the only ones with the idea of  multimedia glasses. While Google has been publicly engineering their Project Glass for a couple of years now, Olympus actually spend the past 7 years quietly designing and creating the MEG4.0. Unlike Google Glasses, the MEG4.0 isn’t a standalone structure and needs your personal glasses to hang on. The weight of the MEG4.0 is less that 30 grams total, thus it shouldn’t feel heavy while using it.

The QVGA (320 x 240) display can connect to devices through Bluetooth 2.1, with Olympus pointing to a smartphone hook-up to provide both the processing power and internet connectivity, much like Google Glasses. While Olympus themselves have yet to announce availability dates nor a price set, they did reveal some information about it during their official press release that you can check out after the break. 
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There’s Only 5 Days Left to get in on Kickstarter Project Pocket TV

Wouldn’t it be awesome to be able to turn any high-definition TV into an Android running Smart-TV?  That’s exactly what Project Pocket TV does and they need your help to get their project started. We have written about Pocket TV and during that time there was 31 days left for consumers to “pledge” money to the program. Now there’s just 5 days left and even though the company has already surpassed their goal of $100,000 with a total of $409,111 in pledges, you are still welcome to pledge. Of course, if you get in now, you can save up to $50 rather than waiting until it’s released. Hit the break for all the details. 
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Samsung to Offer MHL Cable Adapters for Galaxy S III

We’ve previously reported that the Samsung Galaxy S III uses a special MHL/HDMI adapter and you would not be able to use the last-generation MHL to HDMI adapter cables because of hardware changes. Samsung has come forward with a great solution as they have built a 5-pin to 11-pin adapter that allows the old cable to work with the new phone. They also gave a reason as to why the change was made:

Samsung Galaxy S® III uses an 11-pin micro USB input, which allows it to support MHL output and USB on-the-go input simultaneously – an improvement over 5-pin capability. This means that customers can take advantage of new functions for accessories that are not supported by a 5-pin micro USB connector, allowing a deeper convergence between the Galaxy S III smartphone and a HDTV.

To ease this transition and to allow for greater innovation with Samsung accessories, Samsung Mobile will offer a 5-pin to 11-pin MHL Cable Adapter that will allow the original Samsung HDTV Smart Adapter to function properly with U.S. models of the Galaxy S III, as well as future Samsung premium smartphones. In addition, Samsung is offering consumers the ability to purchase the new adapter separately, or to bundle it with the original HDTV Smart Adapter. Our goal in offering these MHL adapter solutions is to provide consumers with the newest accessory technology while ensuring the highest level of device compatibility.


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Build your own Android PC with the Via Technologies APC

Do you have $49, a bit of tech savvy and a creative mind? If so then how does building your own Android based PC sound! VIA Technologies‘ Neo-ITX bare-bones Android PC provides you with everything you need to get started, all you need to do is provide the power supply, any additional accessories and a case.

The miniature chipboard runs Android 2.3 and comes equipped with a 800MHz processor, 512MB of RAM and 2GB internal storage. Connectivity is covered too with an HDMI port, four USB ports, an ethernet port and VGA output. Naturally, as with any PC, you can connect a keyboard, a mouse, speakers and a microphone.

The APC is currently up for pre-order and is due to ship early in July however due to high demand it is currently sold out. You can always register your e-mail address on the website if you’d like to be notified as to when there’s new stock. Click the link below to get going.

 

Source: VIA Technologies

THD N2-A Shows Off Macbook-Esque ICS-Powered N2-A Notebook

We know some of you all love your Macbooks, but wouldn’t you love it if you could have the Android OS in a Macbook body? Well thanks to the THD N2-A clamshell notebook, you will be able to enjoy the best of both worlds. The ICS-powered 13.3-inch notebook features an LED-backlit 1366 x 768 LCD screen, 1.2GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor, 1 gig of DDR3 RAM, built-in WiFi (with an optional ethernet or 3G dongle via the USB ports) and wait for it— a 4200mAh battery. The N2-A does not feature a touchscreen option, so you’ll have to use the touchpad and keyboard (which curiously includes a Windows key by the way) in order to navigate the operating system— though there is the option to connect a USB mouse to the system.

Overall, the N2-A notebook is definitely on the cheaper modest scale. The device itself is incredibly light and thin too for a notebook: it comes in at 3.4 lb, while also including a decent silver finish. You’re probably wondering how much this lovely machine will cost, right? Well, you can’t buy one notebook buy itself, but purchasing the notebook in groups of 500 units will run you about $74,500 from THD directly. But then again you can think of it this way: if you have 500 Android friends who are yearning for some of that Android-on-a-Mac experience, it would come out to about $149 a piece, which is definitely competitive to even premium tablets out there. Hit the break to see photos and video of the N2-A in action.


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Tactus Shows Off Touchscreen Display With Disappearing Physical Keys

 

Do you love your touchscreen, but find it’s not fancy enough for you? Well Tactus might have a solution for you. While at SID 2012, the company showcased its new display product which is a haptic technology offering disappearing physical keys. Yes that’s right— physical keys that actually rise up when in use and disappear when they’re not in use on your display screen. It’s a little hard to fathom, I know but it is currently in development and will likely be a reality when all is said and done, especially as many of us Android users with big hands such as myself may have a difficult time typing on our touchscreen keys, yet loathe actual physical keyboards on our devices. More importantly, it would greatly assist in those with disabilities such as those who are legally blind. This technology would essentially let the masses have their touchscreen cake and eat it too.

While the technology is under development, it has a ways to go before it reaches the mainstream. For starters: the display is only configured for touchscreen layouts. It can only be configured for a QWERTY keyboard in landscape mode and that’s it. This means there are no specific controls such as those meant for gaming and will be incompatible with other keyboard alternatives such as Swype or SwiftKey. Yes it sucks, but you have to start from somewhere I suppose.

Still, you can’t help but be excited for the potential of this technology. I’m sure you’re all itching to get an idea of how this works in action, so why don’t you jump past the break to see a demo video?
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At Google+ Photographer’s Conference, Sergey Brin and Max Braun Discuss Project Glass And How It Creates New Photographic Opportunities [Video]

 

Project Glass, Google’s patented augmented reality glasses prototype, made an appearance at today’s Google+ Photographer’s Conference. Project Glass Tech Lead Max Braun showcased how the glasses can be used to take interesting and unique photographs. Afterwards, none other than Sergey Brin took the stage and continued the talk about exposing new artistic opportunities when you don’t need your hands to take a picture.

To get a photographer’s perspective on the project, they asked the conference attendees to send in their suggestions and thoughts.

Watch the video after the break (you’ll want to skip forward 47 minutes to get to the Project Glass discussion).


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Google Engineer Designs KegDroid, an Adruino-Powered Kegerator Activated by NFC

Many times when people are bored they turn to activities that can be rather uneventful or sometimes even deviant. In the case of Google engineer Paul Carff, his bout of boredom lead to a project that is neither deviant or uneventful and the term bad-ass definitely comes to mind. Meet KegDroid, aka “Betsy”, Carff’s automated kegerator that is controlled by a Motorola Xoom tablet and an NFC card.

KegDroid is essentially an Arduino-automated beer dispenser that that uses an NFC card to link to your Google account. Once linked up and as long as you are authorized, a special app pops up that allows you to pick from the two beers on tap and select the amount of brew to be poured. KegDroid is currently just a personal project that belongs to Carff but in the video he mentions that we would like to see it available around the world in the future. That means that we are stuck dreaming about owning such a cool toy for the time being. Jump past the break to see Carff’s full demo video and to see what could be in store for us in the future.
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