Qeexo’s FingerSense technology adds “ears” to your touchscreen

Touchscreens, by their very nature, receive instructions by sensing touch. But what if you could add another “sense” to your smartphone’s touchscreen capabilities? Say, hearing? That’s what the good folks over at Qeexo have cooked up with their new technology called “FingerSense”. FingerSense uses a small acoustic sensor to pick up vibrations as you touch, swipe, and tap your phone, essentially allowing your smartphone to “hear” how you are interacting with your touchscreen and make adjustments as needed. For example, tapping an icon with your finger would open an app, but if you tap the same icon with your knuckle, it could open a contextual menu. The possibilities are endless. So far FingerSense is able to differentiate between finger, knuckle, fingernail, stylus, eraser, and more. Catch a glimpse of it in action in the video after the break.


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Nexus 4 Smartphone Down Gets Full Teardown Treatment

 

So you own a brand-spankin’ new Nexus 4, but are wondering how the innards of the device look exactly? Well you are going to be in for a pleasant surprise at the gang from the iFixit team has already gone ahead and stripped the smartphone bare for our viewing pleasure. The gang gave a comprehensive walkthrough and thoroughly described everything we need to know about the internals of the device and show in plain view the noteworthy features such as the battery terminal for the 2,100mAh battery, a linear-oscillating vibrator motor and the motherboard of the device featuring the processor and RAM among other things. While it appears to be incredibly complicated what the team had done, they argue most of work was fairly straightforward and in some respects, a piece of cake.

As the device is fairly simple to take apart, one would think the Nexus 4 would have a great Repairability Score and sure enough it does. The device garnered an impressive 7 out of 10, which indicates that aside from a handful of little niggles and issues, owners of the device should be able to fiddle and tinker with no major issues.

I’m sure you’re all itching to see more, so head on down to the source link for the complete Nexus 4 teardown.

 

source: iFixit

Crafty User Successfully Ports Chrome OS Onto Nexus 7 Tablet

 

It’s no secret that that new Samsung Chromebook is one sweet little toy, especially since it features that awesome Chrome OS. But don’t you get the idea that the awesome Chrome OS would be even more awesome on our tablets instead of Jelly Bean? Well that’s what a crafty indie developer Hexxeh believed and took it upon himself to create a fully functional port of Chrome OS onto his Nexus 7 tablet.  Now while the port has its fair share of bugs and is incomplete at this time, you can clearly see in the video below that it does in fact work— and pretty well at that with the Nexus 7 and connected keyboard.

Naturally the port isn’t ready for anyone yet, but the fact that it’s in the wild makes way for big optimism for the cool OS appearing on not just Nexus 7 owners, but tablet owners everywhere. You can check out the video in its entirety below.

 

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source: Hexxeh
via: Droid-Life

Samsung Galaxy Nexus Gets Inductive Charging Mod, Brings Us One Step Closer To Eliminating Wired Futility

 

One of the great things about Android phones is the ability to well… tinker with them. While most of the mod attention goes to the software side of things (i.e. rooting, ROMs, etc.), Android owners forget there is also the ability to tinker with a device’s hardware as well. With that in mind, a crafty Galaxy Nexus owner named Fenris_Ulf took some time to tinker with his device’s battery charging ability. Like most other devices, the Galaxy Nexus features a micro-USB output— which is susceptible to some wear, rendering charging of the device virtually useless and exactly what happened to Fenris_Ulf’s G-Nex.

Fenris_Ulf loved his Galaxy Nexus so much, that he bought another one— but this time, he took some precautionary measures in order to ensure his new Galaxy Nexus would charge… with or without the micro-USB out. He went ahead and ordered the extended battery and cover, a few Palm Touchstones, and a Palm Pixi touchstone cover. Using some geek wizardry (and some added luck), he managed to successfully mod the extended cover in order to all the device to charge inductively. OK in plain English: he hardwired some cables directly from the G-Nex’s innards onto the special cover, allowing for the full ability for him to simply place the modded G-Nex onto the specialized terminal and allow for inductive charging, (almost) no cables needed to charge the phone. Pretty cool isn’t it?

I’m sure you’re interested in all the deets, so hit the source link for the full details and instructions.

source: Hard Forum

Android smartphones to power NASA’s fleet of miniature satellites

We’ve seen Android serve as the basis for so many innovative ventures, but NASA’s latest project could top them all. A team from NASA’s Ames Research center in California has began construction on a group of miniature satellites composed entirely of Nexus smartphones. The project, properly titled “PhoneSat” is just a small part of the larger Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP)  that aims to build nanosatellites by using  small consumer electronics.

NASA has confirmed that the team has already built two nanosatellite prototype models. PhoneSat 1.0 is the first of the two, and offers limited functionality. The goal for this model is to simply observe and determine if a mini-satellite with a consumer smartphone can survive a short period of time in space. However, one of the most important aspects in determining success is if the satellite can actually send back actual health and picture data from space. In addition to sporting a Nexus One, the body of the satellite will include an array of batteries, a watchdog circuit to monitor the system (and reboot the phone, if necessary) and an external radio beacon.


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Samsung starts mass production of super fast NAND flash memory for mobile devices

Your Android phone or tablet is only as fast as its slowest component. It can never hurt to have extra cores, higher clock speeds and copious amounts of RAM but it’s only worth so much if the rest of your device’s specifications aren’t on a par. As ever, Samsung is looking to keep ahead of  the competition by switching on the conveyor belts to begin production of the Pro Class 1500; the world’s fastest high-speed embedded memory (eMMC) flash memory. The Pro Class 1500 is capable of read speeds of 140MB per second and write speeds of 50MB per second, it will also come in 16GB, 32GB and 64GB size variations.

With at least one new Nexus phone expected before the end of the year, here’s hoping we see this high-speed flash memory make a welcome appearance. Check out the full press release after the break.


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ASUS Transformer, Transformer Prime and Motorola Xoom Receive CyanogenMod 10 Preview Builds

The other day we received the CyanogenMod 10 preview builds for both the international and U.S. versions of the Samsung Galaxy S III and now there’s more! The CM 10 preview builds are now available for the ASUS Transformer and Transformer Prime (tf101 and 201) and with Motorola’s Xoom. With all the excitement around Jelly Bean and CyanogenMod 10, a working build for tablets is wonderful news to hear.

These are only preview builds though, so they may not be very stable. Unofficial builds also carry no guarantee on support, assistance or updates.

The Transformer builds are currently functional with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, sounds, camera, video acceleration, minor dock functionality and most sensors. The GPS and light sensor functionality isn’t in there just yet, but the device’s core functionality is stable and working.

Here’s a quick video of the Transformer Prime running CM10 on its current build in action:


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CyanogenMod 10 Preview Build 4.1 For AT&T Samsung Galaxy S III is Now Available [Update: for T-Mobile and Sprint versions as well]

An early preview of CyanogenMod 10 loaded with Jellybean 4.1 has been released for the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S III (UPDATE also for T-Mobile and Sprint versions as well). It’s in a very early state so you won’t be seeing a lot of CM9′s features merged over yet, but hopefully soon.

Some known issues being worked on include:

  • Overlay for UI (extra butter)- We’re waiting on CodeAurora to publish, UI is a little janky.
  • Camera preview turns green during animations and may crash.
  • MMS downloading doesn’t work but sending & retrieving does work, use a 3rd party SMS/MMS app that can download them. (For T-Mobile)
  • All the things.

Hit the break for download links and instructions.


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One Small Step For Man, One Giant Step For The Nexus Q: User Successfully Connects HID Bluetooth Mouse To Device

Sure the Nexus Q is going to be a revolutionary media device for us Android users, but don’t forget— at the end of the day, it’s still a Nexus product and so you know what that means? It means that the Nexus Q is meant to be tinkered with and improved upon silly. After seeing the Q get unlocked and rooted for all kinds of tomfoolery, it was time to see what else could be done with the device. Well thanks to XDA Forum member fredc888, we are now one step closer to being able to see the full potential and take full advantage of the Q’s ability to run apps and games. fredc888 was able to successfully connect a Bluetooth-compliant HID mouse to the device. Yes friends a Bluetooth mouse. That is definitely big time.

While this is an exciting achievement, it is one that should be taken with extreme caution. As you might expect, the Q doesn’t have a traditional Bluetooth menu to allow it to connect to other devices outside of Android phones and tablets, so the Bluetooth stack configuration file must be directly edited to allow input devices and connect to them automatically and naturally— this step requires unlocking the bootloader, which effectively wipes the device’s data partition. Should you make an oopsies, unbricking options for the Nexus Q are limited and that means users should take extraordinary precaution when writing to the device.

Despite the significant risk to the Nexus Q– you can’t help but be excited at the idea of connecting additional gadgets to the device. So if you’re feeling a little lucky, brave or just plain curious, be sure to check out the complete thread— which you can find at the source link below.

source: XDA Forums