Updated Skype application promises to save more battery life

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Many Skype users prefer to stay logged out of the service on their phones and tablets while not video chatting because of a fear of drained battery. If you remember, Google admitted that the Nexus 5 battery is currently experiencing faster battery drain due to the camera communicating with apps such as Skype.

Skype just updated the Android app to version 4.7, which will hopefully alleviate the situation. Just one other change includes message notifications in group chats being turned off by default.

Battery life is precious these days, so anything Skype can do to improve the situation is good news.


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Developer claims Samsung is using a backdoor to access user data, but security expert disagrees

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If this claim is true, Samsung has some explaining to do. According to the folks that develop Replicant, Samsung has “remote access to data.” Now that is a very large claim to be making. So what do they mean? To do this, Replicant says that Android’s largest hardware manufacturer is utilizing two processors as a backdoor to gain user information. The applications processor handles all of the usual functions; however, the other is for the communication coming to and from the handset.
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Samsung partners with Microsoft to access Windows services using Knox

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The past week has seen a couple big announcements from Samsung regarding their Knox security architecture, like the ability to run apps outside of Knox yet receive benefits of secured data and Common Criteria certification. To really help users capitalize from their Samsung devices, Samsung has announced yet another development for Knox, support for a variety of Microsoft services.
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KNOX embedded devices from Samsung receive mobile industry’s first Common Criteria certification

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At the RSA Conference 2014 in San Francisco, Samsung has announced select Galaxy devices that have KNOX embedded on them have received Common Criteria certification as assessed by Gossamer Labs. The Common Criteria certification is described as a “gold standard” for security, demonstrating compliance with a predefined set of security requirements. By meeting this standard, Galaxy devices with the certification can provide additional assurance to enterprises that the devices are acceptable for use in accessing “high-value information assets.”
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Samsung’s Knox 2.0 provides better app data security and brings a new cloud-based store

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Samsung has announced today the next step for its Knox security suite. With Knox 2.0, apps no longer have to be run within Knox. Instead, many apps from the Google Play Store can now operate with Knox to secure app data. Samsung has also launched the Knox Marketplace — a cloud-based store that allows managers to remotely install apps on employee devices. So far, Box and GoToMeeting have joined the Knox Marketplace and Samsung says more companies are actively working on adding their apps. While the Galaxy S 5 ships with Knox 2.0, other Knox-ready devices will be upgraded when they receive the Android 4.4 KitKat update.

Hit the break for the full press release.
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Intel announces 2 new mobile processors at MWC 2014

Intel at MWC - Barcelona, Spain

While much of the focus at MWC 2014 is on smartphone and tablet manufacturers and where they are heading with their devices, other companies are present to help show how they want to power those new devices. Intel was on hand today to announce two new Atom processors, the Merrifield and the Moorefield.

The 64-bit Atom Z3480, formerly known by the codename Merrifield, is a dual-core chip running at 2.13GHz. Using Intel’s 22nm Silvermont architecture, the processor includes an Intel XMM 7160 LTE chip and a PowerVR Series 6 graphics core. Intel says Z3480 equipped devices should start shipping during the second quarter.
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SlickLogin, sound-based security alternative, acquired by Google

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SlickLogin, which announced a new sound-based security system a few months ago at the TechCrunch Disrupt event, has been acquired by Google for an undisclosed amount. The goal of the SlickLogin team is to make logging in “easy instead of frustrating” and that it should not get in the way of a user even when two-factor authentication is used. According to their announcement, SlickLogin says Google agrees.
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Privacy Guard receives new feature in CyanogenMod 11

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If you’ve taken a quick gander over in CM11′s Privacy settings, you’ll see that a new feature has been added. Over in the¬†advanced AppOps view, a new panel has been added showing apps that start up upon your device booting up. This allows you to pick and choose which apps you would like to disable upon booting up.

Certainly a cool feature if you ask me. Out of curiosity, any of you guys use CM as your daily ROM?

source: CM’s Google+

Google Glass vulnerable to JavaScript exploit

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There was a security issue back in Android 4.1 that would allow malicious code (specifically JavaScript) to interject itself into apps that created a WebView, which is something typically done when an app opens up a web window to display an external website, ads, etc. Needless to say, that’s a pretty common thing on Android apps. and apparently that potentially dangerous bug is present in Google Glass, too.

Metasploit, a popular vulnerability testing framework, added a new test module that would allow users to test how vulnerable some versions of the Android browser are to being hacked from shell access, and that’s when this exploit was found in Glass. The exploit would involve a man-in-the-middle hijacking that WebView instance, which wouldn’t be too difficult to do if you’re on a public WiFi or anything that isn’t well secured. At that point, the malicious code could do anything from taking photos with your device to remotely turning on your microphone. Definitely not a good thing.
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Rovio affirms it does not share user data with NSA, other surveillance agencies

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If you were worried that the NSA was spying on you while playing Angry Birds, fear not. Rovio has issued a press release to clear the air. Right out of the gate, Rovio makes it clear that they do “not share data, collaborate or collude with any government spy agencies such as NSA or GCHQ anywhere in the world.” This comes after news broke earlier that the NSA may actually be doing so. Rovio says that third party advertising networks seem to be the culprit of the rumors and the company does not allow any third party network to use or trade any user data.

Hit the break for the full press release.
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