Intel announces 2 new mobile processors at MWC 2014

Intel at MWC - Barcelona, Spain

While much of the focus at MWC 2014 is on smartphone and tablet manufacturers and where they are heading with their devices, other companies are present to help show how they want to power those new devices. Intel was on hand today to announce two new Atom processors, the Merrifield and the Moorefield.

The 64-bit Atom Z3480, formerly known by the codename Merrifield, is a dual-core chip running at 2.13GHz. Using Intel’s 22nm Silvermont architecture, the processor includes an Intel XMM 7160 LTE chip and a PowerVR Series 6 graphics core. Intel says Z3480 equipped devices should start shipping during the second quarter.
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SlickLogin, sound-based security alternative, acquired by Google

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SlickLogin, which announced a new sound-based security system a few months ago at the TechCrunch Disrupt event, has been acquired by Google for an undisclosed amount. The goal of the SlickLogin team is to make logging in “easy instead of frustrating” and that it should not get in the way of a user even when two-factor authentication is used. According to their announcement, SlickLogin says Google agrees.
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Privacy Guard receives new feature in CyanogenMod 11

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If you’ve taken a quick gander over in CM11′s Privacy settings, you’ll see that a new feature has been added. Over in the advanced AppOps view, a new panel has been added showing apps that start up upon your device booting up. This allows you to pick and choose which apps you would like to disable upon booting up.

Certainly a cool feature if you ask me. Out of curiosity, any of you guys use CM as your daily ROM?

source: CM’s Google+

Google Glass vulnerable to JavaScript exploit

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There was a security issue back in Android 4.1 that would allow malicious code (specifically JavaScript) to interject itself into apps that created a WebView, which is something typically done when an app opens up a web window to display an external website, ads, etc. Needless to say, that’s a pretty common thing on Android apps. and apparently that potentially dangerous bug is present in Google Glass, too.

Metasploit, a popular vulnerability testing framework, added a new test module that would allow users to test how vulnerable some versions of the Android browser are to being hacked from shell access, and that’s when this exploit was found in Glass. The exploit would involve a man-in-the-middle hijacking that WebView instance, which wouldn’t be too difficult to do if you’re on a public WiFi or anything that isn’t well secured. At that point, the malicious code could do anything from taking photos with your device to remotely turning on your microphone. Definitely not a good thing.
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Rovio affirms it does not share user data with NSA, other surveillance agencies

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If you were worried that the NSA was spying on you while playing Angry Birds, fear not. Rovio has issued a press release to clear the air. Right out of the gate, Rovio makes it clear that they do “not share data, collaborate or collude with any government spy agencies such as NSA or GCHQ anywhere in the world.” This comes after news broke earlier that the NSA may actually be doing so. Rovio says that third party advertising networks seem to be the culprit of the rumors and the company does not allow any third party network to use or trade any user data.

Hit the break for the full press release.
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The NSA might be spying on you while you’re playing Angry Birds

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Here’s the latest revelation from documents leaked by US whistleblower Edward Snowden.

While you’re enjoying slinging birds at pigs in Angry Birds, chances are that N.S.A might be tracking your personal information. According to documents leaked by Edward Snowden,  N.S.A and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters have been working since 2007 towards achieving a method to snatch data from smartphone apps that contain user’s information. The amount of data gathering is not yet known, but reports suggest that data is collected from social network, mapping and gaming apps.

Earlier reports revealed N.S.A eavesdropping on phone calls as well as intercepting text messages in an effort to prevent terrorism acts. However a recent report by the Guardian indicates that every time the user launches a “leaky” application, the spying agencies can collect information related to user’s location, sex, age and other personal information as well as the phone model and screen size.


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New Windows malware can enter your Android device, affecting Korea for now

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Computer security giant Symantec has found a new piece of malware that targets Android devices through a Windows computer that have been infected. The malware goes by “Trojan.Droidpak” and uses ADB as its way of entry. An app will appear like the Google Play Store; however, it is called the “Google App Store.” After starting the malicious app, it will search for Korean banking apps. After that, it will prompt the user to install malicious ones over the originals. Also, it can intercept emails so users will miss fraud protection notices. It is unknown if this is widespread or just limited to Korea at this time.

As usual, you should be smart and only connect your Android device to a computer that you trust. Disabling “USB Debugging” and enabling “Verify apps” is likely your best choice. Hit the source link to see Symantec’s detailed breakdown.

Source: Symantec
Via: XDA

Chrome exploit allows malicious websites to listen in on you

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Here’s the drawback to Google recently implemented voice recognition into Chrome; malicious websites can utilize that voice recognition to listen in and possibly record you.

Before you freak out, that sounds significantly worse than it actually is. The “exploit,” according to developer Tal Ater, involves a website asking for your permission to use your microphone for whatever purpose. Afterwards, that site can exploit a bug in Chrome’s voice recognition to listen in on you. A site may launch a pop-up to continue listening in even if you’ve closed the tab for that particular site.
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Cisco security report finds 99% of mobile malware targeted at Android devices

Android Security

A new security report published by Cisco has found that 99% of all mobile malware attacks are targeted at Android devices. On top of that, the report says Android suffered 91% of all Java-based web exploits and 71% of all overall web-based exploits. Ouch. This is compared to Cisco finding that Apple’s iOS only encountered 17% of web exploits.

Eric Schmidt has publicly claimed that Android is more secure than iOS, but despite all of Android’s jumps in security and privacy over the past few years, that’s still not quite true. Obviously this doesn’t mean all Android devices are infested pits of malware, but just that you’re more likely to encounter malware attacks on an Android device.

You can check out the full security report below.

source: Cisco

via: TechnoBuffalo

Researchers claim discovery of new Android VPN vulnerability

Android Security

Researchers at the Ben Gurion University Cyber Security Lab are back in the news with a claim that they have discovered a new vulnerability in the Android implementation of VPN. According to the researchers, the exploit would allow a malicious app to bypass an active VPN connection and redirect traffic to a different server. The vulnerability can supposedly be installed without root access and does not need any specific VPN permissions. When the data is redirected by the malicious app, it can be sent unencrypted to a target server without the user being aware the data is being redirected.


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