It’s super easy to bypass factory reset protection on LG’s devices

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When Android 5.1 was announced last year, Google revealed that the firmware carriers a new security protocol that makes it harder to factory reset stolen devices. What the functionality does is enforce a procedure that requires users to enter the credentials of the Google account that was linked to the handset before its system-wide wipe.

Unfortunately for LG owners, it appears that there’s a bug on the South Korean company’s phones making it incredibly easy to bypass the newly-introduced factory reset protection.

More Brain Test malware apps found in Play Store by Lookout

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Anti-virus and security company Lookout is reporting today that they discovered several apps in the Google Play Store that are part of the Brain Test family of malware. Brain Test attempts to gain root privilege on Android devices and can persist even through factory resets or other measures taken by users to remove it once discovered. Google has already removed 13 new apps that were identified in Lookout’s latest efforts.

Carrier IQ resurrected in deal with AT&T

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Back in 2011, when the smartphone market was still relatively young, Carrier IQ earned a degree of infamy by being one of the first companies discovered to be collecting detailed user data and information surreptitiously on mobile devices. Since then, Carrier IQ has managed to stay out of the limelight until now when it was announced that AT&T has acquired rights to Carrier IQ’s software and to some staff that is coming on board at AT&T. At the same time, the Carrier IQ web site has gone dark and it is unclear what the status of the company is.

Synaptics Natural ID fingerprint readers can work through glass displays

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Fingerprint sensors in smartphones are great, but there is one huge thing that sucks about them. The placement. Some are built into the home button like on the Samsung Galaxy devices, but others are awkwardly on the back like on the new Nexus. However, this may all be a thing of the past thanks to Synaptics Natural ID.

Vulnerability in Chrome could allow attackers to take control of Android devices

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In Tokyo, Japan, at the PacSec conference, security researcher Guang Gong revealed an exploit he developed over the past three months that enables a hacker to take control of an Android phone with no user interaction outside of clinking on a link in the Chrome browser. The exploit targets the JavaScript v8 engine in order to open the device up to delivery and installation of malicious code.

You can now buy and download classic TV shows from the BBC’s new digital store

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Fans of classic British TV shows will be happy to hear that the BBC has decided to make its archive of content available to purchase and download via its newly opened BBC Store. Programs such as Doctor Who, Top Gear and Only Fools and Horses, wildlife documentaries from Sir David Attenborough, and reality programs such as The Great British Bake Off are only a few examples of the array of content available.

GranitePhone is new secure phone option from SIKUR and Archos

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Archos, in partnership with SIKUR (think “secure”), has announced the availability of the GranitePhone by SIKUR, a new entry for people who are looking for an ultra-secure smartphone. The GranitePhone joins devices like the Blackphone and the Turing Phone as an option for users who need something more secure than your typical smartphone.

The Umbrella app provides security advice for activists and journalists in hostile environments

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While most of us use our smartphones to organize our daily lives, staying in contact with friends and loved ones through instant messaging and social media outlets, playing games or watching Netflix, smartphones can often be a useful tool for activists and humanitarians in a hostile environment. But how does one safely report on the latest bout of political violence or expose a government cover-up? The London-based group, Security First, has developed an app called Umbrella, aimed at making it easier and safer for activists to carry out their work.