Samsung to delay the launch of its security software for Galaxy smartphones

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It appears that Samsung’s well-known entrant into the enterprise world is set to encounter a slight delay with its arrival. Expected to arrive as early as this upcoming Saturday alongside the Galaxy S 4’s official release for AT&T, Samsung decided that its Knox software is not quite ready for primetime and needs to undergo further testing to ensure it will operate smoothly for various Sammy devices— regardless of wireless carriers. As a result, there are sources that are now claiming that Samsung plans on pushing Knox’s launch until sometime July.

Regardless of the delay, Samsung will continue its push for a full-fledged assault on the enterprise world with its Knox software. Samsung expects to release its security software alongside some variations of its Galaxy devices this year— all in the hopes of taking some of the ever-growing enterprise market share. Let’s just hope that some of the more traditional rivals are ready for Samsung’s imminent arrival.

source: New York Times

Google’s Takes ‘OPN Pledge’ to Protect Open Source and Patents

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Following in the footsteps of Open Source pioneers IBM and Red Hat, Google has taken a giant leap forward in preserving the purity of Open Source and Patents in the world of technology.  In a recent blog post on Google’s “Open Source Blog”, Senior Patent Counsel, Duane Valz, makes a less-than-obvious attack on patent and money hungry technology companies (like the one named after that one fruit that Eve took a bite out of that started this whole mess).  He states the importance of protecting this purity to ensure continued innovation in the world of computer software, and continued advancement in cloud computing, the mobile web, and the internet in general.

Today, Google announced its “Open Patent Non-Assertion (OPN) Pledge“.  In it they pledge “NOT to sue any user, distributor or developer of open-source software on specified patents…unless first attacked.”  Gotta love that last part!  Google, in their infinite wisdom, has included an Apple escape clause (Oops!  Just came right out and said it that time).

At this point Google has only identified 10 patents relating to MapReduce in their initial pledge list, but vow to expand on that list, adding “past, present or future” open-source software that might rely on pledge patents.  Good for you Google! Read more

Lockscreen security flaws seem to be contagious as Sony Xperia Z becomes next victim

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Up until now, the majority of lockscreen security issues regarded Samsung phones, but it seems as though the Sony Xperia Z is suffering from something similar. With a few simple steps, you can bypass the lockscreen on any Xperia Z and get full access to the phone. From what I saw at CES, the Xperia Z is a really nice phone, but this is now the second major issue. Many users have reported their Xperia Z would suddenly die with no way to turn it back on. Sony did issue and update for European owners for that last week, but it looks like Sony software engineers will be hard at work again for another update to rectify this situation. Hit the break for the step by step video tutorial of how anyone can bypass the Xperia Z lockscreen.

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Blackberry introduces its topnotch security software to Android

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Those of you who are looking to get a more secure device can look forward to something new and exciting from Blackberry. It has announced that it plans on bringing its Secure Work Space for Android devices in June, which should bode well for those of you who happen to hear about a little something called Samsung Knox, but want to stay with your existing smartphones. In case you’re not familiar, Secure Work Space is a security solution that allows enterprise customers to separate and secure both work and personal data on employee smartphones— effectively creating a work profile completely independent of a personal profile that’s all on one device. The great thing is that the product is completely managed by BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10, which frees users from the need of having to use separate phones or complicated virtual networks. No word on the cost yet, but further details will probably be out before you know it.

source: AllThingsD

Samsung adds Knox and HomeSync to Samsung Galaxy S IV

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During their big reveal of the Samsung Galaxy S IV tonight, the folks from Samsung talked about a couple new features they were including on the device that users may find useful. The first is the Samsung Knox security scheme. Knox is designed to create a virtual wall between the personal and work areas on a device. Knox may be thought of as the manifestation of their SAFE, Samsung Approved For Enterprise, security and part of their big push to get Samsung devices adopted in the enterprise. Read more

Lookout Security app updated to provide hotfix for Galaxy S III lock screen hack

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Mobile security is being an increasingly big deal, and after that tricky little lock screen hack was discovered last week on a few Samsung model phones, it’s easy to see why. Fortunately, expert security application Lookout has released an update on the Play Store that temporarily patches this issue until Samsung can get a bugfix out to all of the afflicted devices.

Essentially, the hack involved trying to place an emergency call and accessing emergency contacts, then backing out to the home screen from the contact list. This would give the user full access to an unlocked home screen. Lookout has fixed that glitch by preemptively bringing the emergency dialer to the foreground when it’s running, which breaks the home button trick. This hotfix works on the Galaxy S III, Galaxy S III Mini, and the Galaxy Note II. Not a perfect solution, but hopefully this will hold people over until Samsung can personally fix the problem.

source: Lookout Blog

American Airlines’ CTO talks Android selection decision

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American Airlines’ tablet deployment is one of the larget corporate deployments in the U.S. with 33,000 devices in the fleet. You may be familiar with the decision to deploy iPads to pilots with general aircraft information and navigational charts. You may not be so familiar with American’s decision to deploy Samsung Galaxy Note devices to flight attendants, Galaxy Tab devices to mechanics, and making Galaxy Tab devices available to certain passengers for entertainment purposes. Lisa Canada, American’s Managing Director of Operations Technology recently shared some insight into the decision to deploy 23,000 Android powered devices. Read more

Samsung Galaxy S III Security Flaw Allows Potential Hackers Free Reign on Your Home Screen

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SECLISTS.ORG has recently disclosed a potential security flaw on the Samsung Galaxy S III. According to the report, “It is possible to bypass the lock screen on the GSIII allowing an individual full access to the phones features.” We previously reported a similar screen lock bug relating to the Samsung Galaxy Note II.

It appears that when Samsung messes up with security, they go BIG or go home! Similar to the Note II Security flaw, it takes pressing a combination of buttons in the correct sequence to get it to work. Here’s how to do it on the GSIII: Read more

Carbon backup up for Android now supports encrypted devices

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Koushik Dutta, developer of ClockworkMod’s popular Carbon – App Sync and Backup app, announced via Google+ today support for devices that have full device encryption. The new functionality also means the app can work with “Desktop Backup Password” protection, which is used to protect adb backups. In answering questions posed by fellow Google+ users, Dutta indicates he is planning to add cryptfs support in recovery in an upcoming update. Read more

AT&T Delivers Security Patch For Exynos Kernel Exploit On Galaxy Note II

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An over the air software update is available for the AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note II. The update, which became available February 15, serves as a security patch for the Exynos kernel exploit discovered in December.  As with most OTA updates, the carrier recommends downloading via WiFi. Make sure you have plenty of battery power as well. There’s no easier way to brick a phone than by losing power mid software install. It will push the firmware version to I317UCAMA4 but leave Android on 4.1.2.

Source: AT&T