Nexus 10 toolkit now available for all your rooting needs

The Nexus 10 may not be selling as well as LG’s Nexus 4, but that hasn’t detracted from its surmountable capabilities. A little more than a week after making its global debut, the Nexus 10 has received a fully functional root toolkit.

This custom toolkit will allow users to easily root the Nexus 10, as well as perform various root-related functions like unlocking your bootloader, backing up system partitions and installing USB drivers, all without a need to touch that often-feared command line. It’s a fantastic tool for those who are new to rooting their device, or simply want to save valuable time.

Be sure to check out the full list of features, as well as the official download at the source link below. Before proceeding, ensure that you read the instructions at least twice before initiating the rooting process. Godspeed, friends.
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Easy Nexus 4 Root Method Arrives via Toolkit

Nexus 4

What’s the first thing you’re going to do with your new Nexus 4? If you answered, “root that bad boy and unleashed the custom ROM hell hounds,” you’re in luck! XDA developer mskip posted the Nexus 4 Toolkit today to help get you there. If you’re so inclined, we highly recommend you follow our How to unlock and root the Nexus 4 Guide. Results tend to be more consistent with the so called “manual method” described in our guide, but the process is usually a bit tedious. If you’re looking for quick & easy, the Toolkit is for you.

Version 1.1.0, released today, will now let you flash a custom recover, which is essential in performing Nandroid backups and flashing a custom ROM. Hit the source for the full list of features and all important download link. Then you can take advantage of apps like Titanium Backup and One Power Guard for your newly rooted Nexus 4.

Source: XDA

HTC DROID DNA already rooted ahead of next Tuesday’s launch

It hasn’t even been released yet, but that hasn’t stopped the incredibly efficient developers over at XDA from rooting HTC’s new superphone, the DROID DNA for Verizon. The phone itself is quite the powerhouse, sporting a 5-inch 1080p HD display (the highest resolution display on a smartphone to date), a 1.5 GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 APQ8064 Processor, a capacious 2020 mAh battery, Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and basically every other incredible spec that an Android fan could ask for! Combine the awesome hardware with the great custom ROMs that developers will be pushing out thanks to the newly achieved root, and you have yourself quite the handset!

Surprisingly, you will be able to open the bootloader using the HTCDev tools, unless Verizon puts a stop to it with some sort of update. After that’s accomplished, you flash an unsecured kernel and ClockworkMod recovery via fastboot, and finally flash the root.zip file.

If you’re planning on picking up the DROID DNA when it comes out, make sure to head over to the source link to do some reading before you dive into the wonderful world of root!

Source: XDA

 

With CM10 being released, more devices receive official CM10 builds; CM10.1 will be Android 4.2

With stable builds of CyanogenMod 10 being released yesterday to a select devices, more devices should start seeing support as the days go on. Today the U.S. Samsung Galaxy S3, Galaxy Note (1 and 2), HTC One X and S, and Sony Xperia T are now supported, among many others. If you’re curious about your device and if the CM team supports it, you can check out their website for further details.

In other news, with Android 4.2′s source code dropping yesterday, you can expect developers like CyanogenMod to quickly get their hands on that code and start working on their custom version of it. The CM team has revealed that it will be dubbed as CM10.1, rather than a whole new number such as CM11. Since Android 4.2 is still technically Jelly Bean, the team didn’t feel the need to bump the number up to 11. That will probably be saved for the next iteration of Android (Key Lime Pie perhaps?).

Check out CM’s official statement on the matter after the break!


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S-Memo Found To Save Google Passwords In Plain Text And Is Viewable When Device Is Rooted

 

There are always pros and cons when it comes to rooting your Android devices. Among the major pros are being able to make your Android device much more flexible and slap on things like custom ROMs. On the flip side there are cons such as the potential of major security breaches, such as one that was recently found by XDA user graffixnyc. While going through his S-Memo SQLite files on his Galaxy S III, he found out S-Memo store his Google account password in plain text, instead of the password being encrypted. After posting his issue in an open forum thread, another XDA user named ViViDboarder highlighted rooted devices will be able to view internal contents like that of the SQLite files, though graffixnyc the records of the SQLite files should be encrypted, whether a device is rooted or not.

While this is incredibly troubling to hear, this is a good wake up call for all Android owners, especially owners of rooted devices to take extreme caution in ensuring their sensitive information is safe and secure. The last thing you want is your important information getting into the wrong hands and all.

source: XDA Forums

New DMCA ruling upholds rooting of phones not tablets

The latest ruling in the ever complicated Digital Millennium Copyright Act continues to list smartphones as exempt from the rules prohibiting rooting and Jailbraking as it did in 2010. Good news if you’re waiting for the Nexus 4, not so good if you’re waiting for the Nexus 10; tablets are not included in the exceptions.  The Library Of Congress listed five categories of exemptions which will go into effect on October 28, 2012 and will be valid for three years.

The Library of Congress found the definition of “tablet” to be too broad. The ruling determined “the record lacked a sufficient basis to develop an appropriate definition for the ‘tablet’ category of devices, a necessary predicate to extending the exemption beyond smartphones.” They cited “an e-book reading device might be considered a ‘tablet,’ as might a handheld video game device or a laptop computer.”


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AT&T HTC One X gets root method for latest OTA update

The latest OTA update for AT&T’s HTC One X broke the current methods for rooting the device, but of course it never takes the folks over at XDA too long to find another work around when it comes to rooting. This method will use two different exploits to modify your CID and allow you to unlock your bootloader and root the device.

Of course, as with anything that has to do with rooting, this procedure is can be harmful for your device so please read up before you attempt to do this! Check out the source link if you’re interested!

source: XDA

LG Optimus G to officially have locked bootloader

I know the Optimus G on AT&T and Sprint is on many an Android fan’s wish list this fall. However, this bit of news may curb that enthusiasm just a bit. Our pals over at Android Central have personally written LG and received this response from LG themselves:

 

The Optimus G doesn’t support an unlocked bootloader.

 

Straight and to the point. I can’t say that this comes as a huge surprise, it’s just a little perplexing why manufacturers continue to do this.  But there it is, right there in black and white. How will this decision affect your decision on a new device, if at all? LG Nexus anyone?

 

source: Android Central