Expert witness claims Apple’s damage calculations wrong

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In the Apple v. Samsung trial currently underway, one of the issues Samsung is arguing is that Apple has grossly over-exaggerated their damages claim. Apple is asking for more than $2 billion in damages based on the alleged violation of five patents. New York University professor Tulin Erdem was brought in late last week as an expert witness on Samsung’s behalf to counter Apple’s own expert regarding the amount of damages.
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Google exec claims they didn’t copy iPhone software features

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Late last week, Hiroshi Lockheimer, Google VP of engineering for Android, took the stand for the Samsung vs Apple trial. Of course this trial is all about copying Apple, and Lockheimer argued that they never tried to copy Apple’s iOS. Not only that, many of the Android’s software features were created before Apple did.

“We liked to have our own identity; we liked to have our own ideas,” Lockheimer said. “We were very passionate about what we were doing, and it was important that we have our own ideas.”


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Document reveals Android’s pre-touchscreen development

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In the latest bit of interesting information about the history of the development of Android, as is being revealed during the current Apple v. Samsung trial, we get confirmation that Android was originally designed for phones with a physical keyboard. This should probably not come as a surprise as Android was being developed at a time when Blackberry devices ruled the corporate smartphone market. Apple probably considers this to be helpful in their claim that Android and Samsung were copying Apple’s iPhone. However, the same information suggests the Android team had already contemplated a future where touchscreens were popular.
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Samsung Galaxy Tab sales did not actually reach 2 million over six weeks in 2011

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Things can get pretty ugly when two giants go toe-to-toe in court. And that is where Samsung and Apple are these days. The latest punch comes from Apple in the direction of Samsung. It turns out that Samsung did not actually sell 2 million Galaxy Tab units six weeks in 2011 as Strategy Analytics had originally reported. And with this report came the big news that Apple’s tablet market share had fallen. But now it all looks like that was untrue.

An internal report brought forward in court reveals that Samsung actually sold 1 million Galaxy Tab units for all of 2011. The same document highlights Barnes & Noble’s Nook and Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets outselling Samsung’s Galaxy Tab. And Apple dominated the market with 17.4 million iPads sold in 2011. Samsung misled just about everyone by reporting higher Galaxy Tab sales.

Via: Fortune

Samsung sues Korean news site over negative press

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According to a report from Korean news site Media Today, Samsung has filed a 300 million won ($285,000 USD) complaint against the Electronic Times regarding reporting on the camera in the Samsung Galaxy S 5. It appears Samsung took the unusual move of skipping a step that involves a press arbitration board in Korea and has gone straight to filing a lawsuit seeking damages.
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Trial reveals Apple’s marketing chief riled up over Samsung ads

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As the Apple v. Samsung trial starts to move along since starting earlier this week, we may be treated to some interesting bits of information about how the two companies viewed each other and how that guided their strategy. As part of his opening statements on behalf of Samsung, attorney John Quinn  indicated that,

“We will show you internal Apple documents, documents that haven’t been made public before, and showed how Apple was really concerned about competition from Android, and in particular Samsung…This new, edgy marketing strategy…it drove Apple crazy.”
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Privacy concerns regarding Google’s Street View headed to Supreme Court

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Last September, an appeals court ruled that Google’s Street View Wi-Fi sniffing tactics violated the Wiretap Act, and now Google is asking the Supreme Court to overrule that decision.

In order to get accurate Street View data, Google sniffs unencrypted Wi-Fi networks such as nearby homes and businesses. Some people see it as wiretapping, but Google thinks capturing unencrypted Wi-Fi is not wiretapping. After further investigations, it was found that an engineer was electronically eavesdropping as part of a 20-percent project, but he also urged the company’s legal team to “weigh in” before deploying the code to the Street View fleet.  That request “slipped through the cracks,” and Google apologized with the understanding they would destroy the never used data.


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