Google and Apple CEOs Are Meeting For Behind-The-Scenes Patent Talks

The Patent Wars of 2012 already claimed one victim to the tune of $1.05 billion, and they don’t seem to be stopping any time soon. Now it seems it’s time to get the grown-ups involved. According to reports from Reuters, Google CEO Larry Page and Apple CEO Tim Cook have been conducting closed-door meetings about patents, intellectual property issues, and other things CEO’s talk about.

Apparently, the two head-honchos already had a phone talk last week, and talks at lower levels are also occurring between the companies. More talks between Page and Cook are expected in the coming weeks, but a Friday appointment has apparently been postponed to an unknown date, and for unknown reasons, though it could just be scheduling conflicts.

We’re not sure exactly what the talks involve, but one source has speculated that it could be the beginning of a truce about the disputes over basic features and functions in Android. I would tend to think these two would more likely talk at a higher level, discussing a possible broad settlement, rather than getting bogged down in the minute details of every issue. One thing’s for certain, though. The majority of their differences revolve around the rapidly growing mobile space, which is obviously of crucial important to both companies.

I, for one, applaud the intent of these discussions, and hope it can bring an end to all the litigation, which is only good for the lawyers involved. Will it bear fruit? I hope so, but I’m not holding my breath.

source: reuters

Samsung strikes back, vows to sue Apple if next iPhone features 4G LTE

While Samsung may have suffered a massive blow in its lawsuit against Apple, the Korean-based manufacturer isn’t giving in anytime soon. A new report has confirmed that Samsung will immediately sue Apple if its next iPhone utilizes long-term evolution (LTE) technology.

Samsung has been a major player in the development of 4G LTE and holds a vast portfolio of relevant patents, equating to 10% of all LTE patents in existence. Considering Apple has already introduced an iPad with LTE, it’s almost guaranteed that the company’s  upcoming iPhone will feature the same connectivity option.

Unfortunately for Samsung, this task may not be as easy as it sounds. LTE is a market-wide standard, which means Samsung’s patents could (and probably will) be subject to FRAND law. Either way, if Apple chooses to incorporate LTE into the iPhone 4S successor, things are sure to get heated.

Source: Korea Times
Via: Phandroid 

Apple’s Recent Victory Is A Blessing In Disguise For Samsung: Research Shows Increased Galaxy S III Sales Since Verdict


Samsung may have a recent $1 billion verdict against itself, but it looks like the recent dogfight it had against Apple has had a rather profound benefit: increased Galaxy S III sales. According to Trip Chowdhry who is the managing director of equity research at Global Equities Research, customers “rushed” to buy the Galaxy S III smartphone after the verdict was announced. In terms of specifics— Chowdhry used a sample of three Costco stores and found two of three Costco stores were completely sold out of the AT&T version of the smartphone. In addition, Chowdhry found that out of a sample of 5 AT&T stores, every store experienced “significant sales” of the smartphone and more importantly— outsold the Apple iPhone 4S.

Talk about the recent ruling backfiring against Apple, sheesh. Samsung has yet another reason to smile on top of its existing millions upon millions of sales and maybe consumers aren’t so blind after all.

source: Forbes

Apple and Motorola Strike Licensing Deal in Germany

On Monday, a filing was made with the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California in which Motorola Mobility (Google) and Apple entered into a standard-essential (FRAND) patent license agreement. The agreement states that Apple is now licensed to use Motorola’s FRAND patents in Germany. The royalty rate has yet to be set.

Now you have to understand, when it comes to standard-essential patents, the patent owner (Moto) must agree to a licensing deal with a competitor (Apple) if that competitor makes an offer to accept a licensing arrangement. The patent holder cannot refuse without blatantly violating antitrust law. That also means that Apple is essentially admitting to infringing the patents and is liable for past damages.

The filing only covers “cellular standard-essential” patents, leaving Wi-Fi and video codecs open for a later fight. Or separate licensing deals could be struck for those if both parties are tired of fighting.

Hmm, perhaps Microsoft had the right idea all along avoiding the courts and sleeping with its enemies instead. It sure is much less expensive.

source: foss patents
via: engadget

Judge Koh sets December 6th date for hearing on Apple’s injunction on 8 US Samsung devices

Judge Lucy Koh has set the date for the Samsung vs. Apple hearing in which Apple wants 8 Samsung smartphones to be banned in the US. On December 6th both Samsung and Apple will be at it again in court, and as usual, Samsung will be defending itself as Apple seeks to block sales of several of the Korean maker’s top selling US handsets. Samsung will also be busy on September 20th as they’re working on lifting the ban that’s currently on the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Considering the jurors found that the Tab 10.1 was not infringing upon Apple’s patents, I would imagine that the ban should be lifted. Then again, I’m no lawyer so we’ll see how that turns out.

This has been such a long and tiring road. I can only imagine the stress this has put on Samsung. I’m sure we’ll all be tuning into our Twitter feeds come December 6th.

source: MSNBC

Samsung plans to fight injunctions using ‘all necessary measures’

After receiving a guilty verdict last week, Samsung faces the possibility of having several of its devices banned in the United States. Today, the company has promised to fight Apple’s attempt to ban these devices, claiming “we will take all necessary measures to ensure the availability of our products in the U.S. market.”

A spokesman for the company told reporters that Samsung’s options included filing to stop the injunction, appealing if the judge grants it, and modifying its infringing products if necessary. It’s also been reported that Samsung officials have already begun discussing with wireless carriers about the potential need to remove or modify existing features that violate Apple’s IP in order to keep its products on the market. This would be the case with smartphones like the Galaxy S II, which is still being sold by several major US carriers.

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Apple-Samsung jury foreman Vel Hogan on the jury: ‘Nobody owned an iPhone’ [Video]

There has been a lot of talk about Apple getting “home field advantage” in the recent Apple vs. Samsung case on patent infringement. Recently jury foreman Vel Hogan sat down with Emily Chang on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg West”, and said that none of the jury members owned an iPhone. Of course that wasn’t all as the interview was roughly 17 minutes long. You may wonder what evidence seemed the most damaging, and Hogan mentions the fact that Google warned Samsung that their prototypes resembled Apple’s, but Samsung ignored it. He also mentioned J.K. Shin’s internal email that said the comparison between the iPhone and Samsung’s prototypes was that of “heaven and earth.”

source: bloomberg


Samsung Shares Drop $12 billion In Light of Verdict and Potential Ban

Samsung Electronics Co.’s market value dropped a whopping $12 billion today in lieu of Friday’s ruling which ordered the Korean electronics company to pay over $1B in damages from patent infringement. Despite Samsung’s wide array of products and services, phones and tablets make up roughly 70% of the company’s earnings.

The ruling isn’t the only factor affecting the plummeted shares as Apple is currently seeking a ban on eight of Samsung’s smartphones, among them the widely popular Galaxy S II. In addition there is growing concern that the verdict may lead to Apple bringing on a second lawsuit which could lead to a ban of Samsung’s current flagship phone, the Galaxy S III, which has already accounted for sales over 10 million units since its May debut. Apple is planning to file a sales injunction against Samsung on September 20.

According to an internal memo sent this morning to its employees and the media, Samsung is trying to rally its employees and hasn’t given up the fight. What do you think? Is this a hurdle Samsung can easily jump over? Will this hurt Samsung, Google, and the Android operating system? Tell us what you think!

Source: Reuters

Apple seeks ban on eight Samsung smartphones in the US

In the wake of Samsung’s guilty verdict, Apple has filed a notice with the court naming a slew of devices it plans to ban in the US. Considering most of the devices found to be in violation of Apple’s patents aren’t being sold anymore, the Cupertino-based company is only seeking a ban on eight smartphones.

  • Galaxy S 4G
  • Galaxy S2 (AT&T)
  • Galaxy S2 (Skyrocket)
  • Galaxy S2 (T-Mobile)
  • Galaxy S2 Epic 4G
  • Galaxy S Showcase
  • Droid Charge
  • Galaxy Prevail
To better depict its reasoning, Apple has also included a chart showing the patents that each device infringes upon. Unsurprisingly, the chart shows that all of the listed devices, excluding the Galaxy Prevail, infringe upon Apple’s design patents and trade dress. However, Samsung’s Galaxy S II Skyrocket, Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch and Galaxy S Showcase are the only phones that managed to not infringe on Apple’s utility patents.

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