Samsung appeals to Supreme Court regarding Apple design patents


Earlier this month it was revealed Samsung agreed to pay Apple over half a billion dollar settlement from their historic patent battle of a few years ago. Samsung said they reserved the right to claw back some of the payment if a planned appeal to the Supreme Court was successful, indicating the case would continue despite the payment. Today Samsung filed an appeal with the Supreme Court concerning how the court handled design patent violations in the Apple case. Read more

EU files claims alleging Qualcomm engaged in anti-trust activities


The European Commission has formally filed charges, “Statements of Objections,” alleging chipmaker Qualcomm has violated EU rules designed to prevent anti-competitive activity. The claims allege Qualcomm paid a major customer to exclusively use its chipsets in their smartphones and that Qualcomm sold chipsets below cost for the express purpose of forcing a competitor out of the market. Read more

Samsung to pay Apple half a billion, but case not over yet


In a new joint filing with the courts submitted by Samsung and Apple, Samsung has agreed to pay over half a billion dollars to Apple pursuant to the judgment against them in a patent dispute between the two companies. This “sort of” settlement comes nearly five years after Apple’s original complaint and several years after Apple succeeded at the trial court level. Thus far, Samsung had not paid a single penny on the original award that was over $1 billion, but now they have agreed to make a payment of $548 million, the current amount owed after a series of appeals and adjustments. Despite agreeing to this payment, Samsung thinks they are retaining the right to possibly get some of this money back at some time in the future, a point that Apple disagrees with. Read more

Google sheds some light on EU’s requirement to keep some info out of the light


Back in 2014, the European Union’s courts decided individuals covered by their jurisdiction had a right to not have some information about them show up in search results, the so-called “right to be forgotten.” Although action to protect individuals exercising this right applies to all search engines, by virtue of its size and having been a party to the original complaint, Google has been the primary recipient of attention regarding how this right will actually be implemented. To help the public understand the impact of the decision, Google has released a transparency report on search removals. Read more

Sprint facing yet another fine, this one involving extra charges for lower-credit consumers


Sprint may be a large corporation with decades of experience in the business market, but that does not mean everything works like a well-oiled machine. The carrier has recently been hit with several actions that can be traced to sloppy attention to detail or, as the cynic may contend, an intentional effort to cut corners. The latest hit comes from the Federal Trade Commission which has proposed $2.95 million in civil penalties related to failure to give proper notices when customers were charged extra due to low credit scores. This comes in the same week that Sprint lost an appeal in the state of New York regarding a $300 million fine for not collecting taxes. Read more

Chinese officials open investigation into Xiaomi’s use of the word “best” in ads


A new report out of China says the Ministry of Industry and Commerce has opened an investigation into whether Xiaomi illegally used the term “best” in advertising on its web site in violation of a new advertising law. The new law went into effect on September 1st and includes prohibitions on all sorts of advertising activity, including the use of superlatives like the word “best” in advertisements. Companies that are found to be in violation may face penalties starting at $31,000 USD. Read more

GrubHub, DoorDash, and Caviar all sued for failing to offer employee benefits


On-demand food service apps GrubHub, DoorDash, and Caviar are all being sued with separate lawsuits in San Francisco. The lawsuits are over employee benefits, claiming the services failed to offer employee benefits while still treating the workers as full-time. Failing to cover things like reimbursements for gas, parking and phone data.

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