Cyanogenmod 9 stable build for Google Galaxy Nexus (GSM) released, more devices to follow

The CyanogenMod team has started the process of releasing stable builds of CM9. The first device to be released is the Google Galaxy Nexus (Maguro) which was released earlier today. Indications are that release was a bit premature and a very minor update will be rolling out later this evening. Builds for other devices are also anticipated to start appearing on the download page.

CM9 is based on Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. The stable builds represent the end of development on CM9 as the CyanogenMod team transitions to work on CM10 based on Jelly Bean. Hit the source link if you are interested in grabbling CM9 for your Galaxy Nexus or to keep an eye open for a release for your device.

source: cyanogenmod downloads

Jelly Bean Encryption Negatively Affects Paid Apps

 

While the Android platform tries to be the best OS in the game, there are minor problems that plague it such as rampant piracy issues—- specifically with developers of various apps in the Play Store. While Google has addressed piracy issues with each new OS release such as with Jelly Bean’s App Encryption, its solution has ended up being worse for developers. Apparently developers are claiming encryption (the location of installed and encrypted apps from the Play Store) makes their apps completely unusable because account information is removed after a device reboot. Because of this— Google has disabled the security feature for the Play Store on Jelly Bean smartphones and tablets.

 


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Online Nandroid Backup allows Nandroid backups without booting into recovery

 

If you’re an avid Android “rooter” and “ROM flasher,” then I’m sure the Nandroid backup feature that custom recoveries offer has been your best friend. It’s essential to perform a Nandroid backup before you wipe and flash your newly desired ROM in case something goes wrong and you need to restore your phone into a previously working state.

If you’re not familiar with how a traditional Nandroid backup works, you are required to turn the phone off and boot into the recovery to perform the procedure. A typical Nandroid backup takes about 4-6 minutes, thus your phone would be nonoperational for that period of time. An XDA developer by the name of ameer1234567890 found that troublesome as he would constantly miss important calls and texts from his family and took it upon himself in creating  away to perform a Nandroid backup without having to boot into recovery. Online Nandroid Backup allows the user to perform a Nandroid backup without the need to turn your phone off, thus you won’t miss important calls or texts.

Using the program is actually fairly simple and easy to follow:


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Android’s multiple user accounts gets showcased in video

A few days ago we told you about how Android already has some built in functionality for multiple user accounts, but just not complete. If you’re not familiar with what this concept is, it allows you to have separate log ins for your tablet or smartphone. For example, you could set up your tablet the way you want as far as home screens and whatever apps you use, but other family members could log in under a different account, and they would get their own set up of apps and home screens.

This is something that is within the AOSP, but not something that is ready for prime time. It only means that it’s something we will probably see in a later version of Android like 4.2 or 5.0. None of this will stop the amazing Android development community as XDA member zanderman112 was able to setup multiple accounts using Terminal Emulator. Unfortunately there isn’t too much functionality, but this is a major start. Check out the video after the break.


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Ice Cream Sandwich is now ported to the Raspberry Pi

The credit card sized Raspberry Pi computer that sells for $25 now has a working version of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich thanks to a port. The development community has been working towards getting Android on the Raspberry Pi with CyanogenMod 7.2 and CyanogenMod 9, but this is by far the most usable. This port even supports hardware-accelerated graphics, but unfortunately sound isn’t yet available.

This device is quite limited so this is pretty impressive. The Raspberry Pi sports a 700MHz single-core processor and only 256MB of RAM. Hit the break for a video showcasing it in action.


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Snapdragon S1 devices won’t get support for CyanogenMod 9 or CyanogenMod 10

In a Google+ post yesterday, the CyanogenMod team announced that Ice Cream Sandwich (CM9) and Jelly Bean (CM10) won’t be supported for Snapdragon S1 devices. One such phone is the Nexus One and they stated that it would require a custom hboot to repartition the internal memory. The fact that there is only 512MB of RAM certainly doesn’t help the matter. On top of that, compromises to the CyanogenMod code would be necessary because of the proprietary libs available from 2.3.

They went on to say that “with enough time, effort, and hacks” it could be made to work, but they don’t feel the experience is worth all of that. Other main attraction phones that have the Snapdragon S1 are the HTC EVO 4G and the HTC Desire.

source: google+

 

Multi-User Accounts Slowly Coming to Android, Codes Already Being Implemented in AOSP

 

Multi-user accounts on an Android device is something that users have been longing for. Having multiple user support is something that personal computers have had for quite some time now, thus it only makes sense for it to finally be implemented into Android phones, and most importantly, Android tablets. Thanks to some digging by one of CyanogenMod’s finest developers ciwrl, it seems as if Google has left some “bits and crumbs” of code within Android AOSP (Android Open Source Project) suggesting that multi-user accounts will eventually make its way into Android.


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NFC Hack Allows Verizon Galaxy S III Owners To Use Google Wallet

 

Next to the locked bootloader, the absence of Google Wallet in Verizon’s flavor of the Samsung Galaxy S III smartphone is a major buzzkill to owners of the device. Fortunately, the Android world is graced with fine individuals who strive to correct unjust actions by big brands. And with that, crafty developers Mike Beauchamp and Dustin Evans developed a special hack, which allows the NFC-capable smartphone to now utilize the famed mobile payment function. Naturally you’ll need your Galaxy S III to be rooted and it wouldn’t hurt to have some working knowledge of how to tweak and tinker, but it’s all worth it once you’ll have that sweet, sweet ability to tap your smartphone against any and all of those Google Wallet payment terminals.

Interested Verizon Galaxy S III owners can hit the source link for full details.

source: XDA

Prelim build of CyanogenMod 10 now available for Galaxy Nexus

Late last week, Brint Kriebel, a device maintainer with CyanogenMod, made a preliminary build of CM10 available for Galaxy Nexus phones. Kriebel indicates he has been using the build for a couple weeks now as his daily driver on his Verizon Galaxy Nexus and most hardware functions work properly. It is an AOSP build, so Google apps are not included. Being a preliminary build and not an actual release, bugs are expected and should not be reported. If you are interested in trying out CM10 on your Galaxy Nexus, hit the source link for the file. Just be sure to make your backup before you undertake the install.

source: Google+