HTC Thunderbolt Official Ice Cream Sandwich build leaks, Hackers rejoice

An official Ice Cream Sandwich build for the HTC Thunderbolt just leaked. What does this mean?  All of the adventurous Verizon-ites out there can flash the ROM before Verizon gives the official thumbs up.  The  build number is 7.00.605.2 which bumps the device up to Sense 3.6 and greatly improves the user experience.  HTC even includes an awesome “Quick Settings” tab and a completely revampted settings menu.

The ROM itself is stock and deodexed, but does include root.  HTC’s “spyware” was also removed.  You can grab the file from the source link below.

Until HTC and Verizon finalize everything in the hopes of meeting their self-imposed August deadline, this will have to do.

source: teambamf

MIUI Jelly Bean ROMs now available for Nexus 7 and Galaxy Nexus

MIUI has proven to be a highly desirable aftermarket firmware among the developer community, and today marks the initial release of Jelly Bean builds for the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 7 and Nexus S. Currently, the ROMs contain no major bugs, which is good news considering previous Ice Cream Sandwich builds offered less than ideal functionality. The massive changelog offers an in-depth look at the the backend changes that had to be made to support the bump to Android 4.1. Fresh features include a revamped video player UI, a new contact manager and hundreds of optimizations. You can read the official instructions and download your ROM after the break.

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AOKP Jelly Bean Build 1 now available!

CyanogenMod (CM) and the Android Open Kang Project (AOKP) are the two most feature filled ROM’s that you can find in the custom ROM world. With CM10 Nightlies having been released just a couple of days ago, it was only natural for the AOKP team to follow suit and release their first official build of Jelly Bean AOKP. There’s far too many features that AOKP provides to list them all, but here’s the popular ones that you can expect:

  • Notification Toggles
  • Lockscreen tweaks (no custom targets yet)
  • Navigation bar modifications
  • Custom kernel performance options
  • LED colors
  • Notification wallpapers
  • Phone ringer modifications (Flip call to silent, silent/vibrate when headphones are in)
  • Plus more!

You can head on over to the source link for a download link, the device maintainer list and their Gerrit page. Let us know if you’ve given AOKP a shot and tell us your experience with the ROM!

source: AOKP Google+

Sony Xperia S and AOSP – a Google experiment

Earlier this week, Jean-Baptiste Queru, Google’s Technical Lead on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), announced a new experiment he was starting up. Up to now, the AOSP has focused on Nexus class devices. As Queru explains, AOSP was setup so that in theory it would be possible to plug in files for additional hardware targets. Thus far though, the theory has not translated into practice. Queru hopes this new experiment may change that and help identify and eliminate hurdles present in the theory as it moves to practice.

The target of the experiment is Sony’s Xperia S model. Queru selected the LT26 as it is a fairly powerful device currently on the market, has an unlockable bootloader, and a manufacturer that is friendly toward open source projects and philosophy.

If you are interested in helping out with the effort, check out the source link. Otherwise, keep an eye on this experiment as it may yield positive results not only for the Xperia S, but for other devices as well.

source: Google Groups
via: The Verge

CyanogenMod 10 Nightlies Officially Available Beginning Tonight

The CyanogenMod team has formally announced that official CM10 nightlies will be available starting tonight. For rooted users, this is Christmas time as CM ROM’s are the current king when it comes to the Android modding community. The devices receiving the CM10 nightly treatment will include, but are not limited to:

  • The US SGS3 variants
  • The Galaxy Nexus variants
  • The Nexus S varaints
  • The Nexus 7
  • The Transformer and Transformer Prime
  • The SGS1 variants (Vibrant, Captivate, International, and i9000b)
  • The SGS2 i9100g
  • P3 and P5 tablets

According to the CM team, “Other devices will join the roster as they become ready and gain their maintainers blessing for nightlies.

Just keep in mind that you, and you only, are responsible for anything that were to happen to your device if you decide to delve into flashing custom ROM’s. With that said, enjoy and let us know your experience with the CM10 nightlies once they become available later tonight!

source: CM’s Google+ Page

Custom Kernel for the Nexus 7 Brings Huge Performance Boost

One of the biggest advantages of owning an Android device is having the ability to customize not only the interface, but the system settings itself. Part of that includes flashing a custom kernel, which can bring all sorts of enhancements to a variety of levels. Such settings include specifying voltages, underclock or overclock speeds of the CPU, custom color settings. You get the idea.

XDA Senior member clemsyn has created a modified kernel for the Nexus 7 called the Elite Kernel, which is a modified version of the Motley kernel originally created by XDA Senior Member _motley. Hit the break for the list of tweaks this customized kernel brings.

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Easily Crack Android’s Pattern Unlock, No Root Required

Hey modders, devs, and hackers! You know how you keep that “USB Debugging” option checked in settings? Sure, it’s useful when you need to root a device or test an app you’re developing, but you might want to consider unchecking it when not using it.

XDA developer M.Sabra says that anyone with a little ADB knowledge can easily hack Android’s pattern unlock, essentially getting access to your entire device. Apparently it’s not that difficult to do either. Root isn’t even required.

We won’t go into detail here on how to do it, but hit the source link to find out how easily your phone can get hacked if you lose it. Don’t believe your pattern gives you total protection.

source: xda

The inevitable has happened, Verizon’s Samsung Galaxy S III’s bootloader has been unlocked

 

The second I saw this story on the XDA thread, I envisioned many Verizon Samsung Galaxy S III users giving Verizon the proverbial middle finger. This locked bootloader issue with Verizon’s Samsung Galaxy S III has certainly made a full circle. It started off with many angry customers when Verizon formally announced that the bootloader will be locked on their Galaxy S III, but soon after there was hope as a couple of miss-informed Verizon and Samsung reps told various people that an update for the S III would be out soon that would unlock the bootloader. Verizon quickly denied that rumor and left us all with the hopes of XDA soon finding a way to crack Verizon’s lock on the bootloader.

Well folks, that day has come as the XDA developer by the name of AdamOutler has released instructions on how to unlock your Verizon Galaxy S III’s bootloader. Before I give you all the instructions, it’s important to first read AdamOutler’s precautionary statement first:

Let me make this clear. If Samsung updates your device’s bootloaders, using this tool could potentially brick your device. Once you apply this, never accept a factory update without first flashing the Odin Packages in the Original Post of this thread. As a general rule, you want to be the last guy to apply any Samsung update. Run custom. 

As of the date of this posting, this works great on Linux and it should work wonderfully on Mac too. If you’re using Windows, I recommend downloading Windows Ubuntu Installer(WUBI) to install Ubuntu from within Windows. 

First you’ll need to download the file needed for this:

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Use Your Nexus 7 To Make And Receive Voice Calls Through Google Voice

XDA member bongostl has posted a step-by-step guide for modifying your Nexus 7, or any tablet for that matter, to enable outgoing and incoming calls through Google Voice. This requires the editing of system files, so your tablet needs to be rooted. What this method does is make the tablet think it’s voice capable, which allows dialer app voice+ to connect through Google Voice and place a call.

Incoming calls will be handled by any SIP app, such as CSipSimple, which requires you to also set up a call number and routing using other online services such as callcentric and ipkall. Couple all that with Google Voice, an edited and recompiled framework-res.apk file, and the flashing of an update.zip, and you’ve got yourself a really large tablet-phone in 16 quick and easy steps.

Or you can download GrooVe IP from the Play Store and skip all the rest.

Ok, that was snarky. To be fair, bongostl’s method has the advantage that you can still receive calls in your Gmail on your computer, whereas with GrooVe IP, it’s one or the other. But seriously, to me this all seems like way too much of a hassle with too many potential points of failure to really be worth it for most people.

Bottom line: Hackers and tweakers only. Everyone else just get GrooVe IP.

source: xda