Ice Cream Sandwich is now ported to the Raspberry Pi

The credit card sized Raspberry Pi computer that sells for $25 now has a working version of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich thanks to a port. The development community has been working towards getting Android on the Raspberry Pi with CyanogenMod 7.2 and CyanogenMod 9, but this is by far the most usable. This port even supports hardware-accelerated graphics, but unfortunately sound isn’t yet available.

This device is quite limited so this is pretty impressive. The Raspberry Pi sports a 700MHz single-core processor and only 256MB of RAM. Hit the break for a video showcasing it in action.


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Snapdragon S1 devices won’t get support for CyanogenMod 9 or CyanogenMod 10

In a Google+ post yesterday, the CyanogenMod team announced that Ice Cream Sandwich (CM9) and Jelly Bean (CM10) won’t be supported for Snapdragon S1 devices. One such phone is the Nexus One and they stated that it would require a custom hboot to repartition the internal memory. The fact that there is only 512MB of RAM certainly doesn’t help the matter. On top of that, compromises to the CyanogenMod code would be necessary because of the proprietary libs available from 2.3.

They went on to say that “with enough time, effort, and hacks” it could be made to work, but they don’t feel the experience is worth all of that. Other main attraction phones that have the Snapdragon S1 are the HTC EVO 4G and the HTC Desire.

source: google+

 

Google Posts Updated 4.1.1 Binaries for the Nexus S 4G

Last month we reported that Google had resolved issues regarding the Nexus S 4G’s full aosp support, adding they could now “…properly distribute its CDMA and WiMAX binaries.” Today this goes a step further with the publishing of the, latest binaries (JRO03H Android 4.1.1) for the Nexus S 4G (Sprint). It’s a bunch of technical talk meaning one major thing: loads of new AOSP Jelly Bean ROMS. 
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Prelim build of CyanogenMod 10 now available for Galaxy Nexus

Late last week, Brint Kriebel, a device maintainer with CyanogenMod, made a preliminary build of CM10 available for Galaxy Nexus phones. Kriebel indicates he has been using the build for a couple weeks now as his daily driver on his Verizon Galaxy Nexus and most hardware functions work properly. It is an AOSP build, so Google apps are not included. Being a preliminary build and not an actual release, bugs are expected and should not be reported. If you are interested in trying out CM10 on your Galaxy Nexus, hit the source link for the file. Just be sure to make your backup before you undertake the install.

source: Google+

Unofficial CM10 and AOKP Builds Released for Verizon’s Galaxy S III

Verizon’s locked bootloader on their Galaxy S III hasn’t stopped development at all to this point. Two unofficial ports of AOKP and CyanogenMod 10 popped up, with each either being as close to fully working as can be or with a couple of minor bugs that are currently being worked on.

AOKP Milestone 6 appears to be ready for release and a daily driver without any known bugs so far. CM10 is currently still being referred to as an “alpha”, however, data and all the other most important core features are working. You may just want to look into either one of these, especially CM10 as they always do a outstanding job and go beyond the call of duty.


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Legacy Play Store Allows You To See A List of Your Purchased Apps Again

Before the Android Market switched over to the Play Store the Market allowed you to see a list of your purchased apps under a “Not installed” section. After the transition to the Play Store, at some point along the update line, the list of paid apps went away. If you’re wanting the ability to see that list again, Paul O’Brien over at Modaco, has solved the problem. You can get the Legacy Play Store app that will solve your problem by bringing back the “Not installed” list of apps.

Paul was able to get the old version of the Play Store client and with some tinkering around, he was able to make it run alongside the official Play Store. Once again, in the Legacy Play Store your apps will have a My Apps screen with a list of all the paid apps you’ve purchased that are not installed on your device. The current version of the Play Store has a tab for all of your apps that are installed or you’ve ever installed, and lumps these together with any apps you’ve purchased. If you’ve purchased a  lot of apps, you may find yourself having trouble finding the small handful of paid apps you want for your respective devices.


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AndroPlatina Utilities Aims to be the Root Toolkit for ALL Android Devices

I am a huge fan of rooting my devices, it allows deep customization and the ability to load any ROM I want to. I own a GSM version of the Galaxy Nexus and while I wasn’t planning on rooting it, 2 hours after delivery I was punching fastboot commands into terminal to do just that.

Well XDA recognized contributor, varun.chitre15, is working hard to make this easy to do for ALL devices and with one program none-the-less. It’s called “AndroPlatina” and is a toolkit to make hacking and modifying your Android device easy with just a few clicks.


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National Ice Cream Month Receives Wallpaper by Andrew Bell

Did you know this month is National Ice Cream Month? Andrew Bell is celebrating by releasing a tasty treat for your desktop. The man behind the Android Series 3 Collectibles made a wallpaper showing Androids eating and serving ice cream cones. Jelly Bean has been the hot topic this month, but Andrew Bell decided to honor Ice Cream Sandwich with this wallpaper.

Click on the source link to get the wallpaper in different sizes.

source: Android Foundry
via: Phandroid

Ringtone Editor In Jelly Bean Changelog Trashed or Forgotten?

Take a look at the above listing on Google. A ringtone editor you say? For a moment, I was so excited, then after looking at the changelog for Jelly Bean, it wasn’t there. Apparently they planned on releasing one, but they must of either trashed the idea or forgot about it, I hope it’s the latter one. Instead of having to do a bunch of editing on my computer to get a decent ringtone I could potentially do it all on my smartphone? Now that sounds helpful!

Android Police posted this image of a decompile:


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XBMC Is Alive And Kicking, Gives An Idea Of How It Looks When Running On A Nexus Q

 

Remember how we told you about how XBMC was on its way a few days ago? Well it’s already here— albeit in an early form. CyanogenMod developer Jason Parker used his skills to develop a working port of the app for the Nexus Q and other Android-based set-top boxes, as well as most smartphones. From what we can tell, the interface looks like its centered around arrow keys and while touch input does work, the text is too small to see and operate on a smartphone or tablet. For now, it’s looking like the app may be best-suited for a set-top box that can run Android apps since there will presumably be a bigger screen to work with.

As you might expect, XBMC is still in its early form, so there may be a bug or two (or three or four). Nevertheless, it’s still cool to see the app being completely functional and somewhat ready for those who are ambitious enough to try it out.

source: Android Police