AOSP commit could point to next version of Android using ART over Dalvik

by Jared Peters on
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Android ART 4.4

One of the big changes in Android 4.4 was the addition of ART, a new runtime compiler for apps that was set to replace the aging Dalvik. ART was introduced as an experimental feature in Android’s developer options, and it came with its own set of problems. Even though ART was quite a bit faster than Dalvik, many apps didn’t play nice with the new compiler, and even though several apps have been updated to be able to function with it, it’s still not the norm for most apps. Of course, since ART was an experimental feature, it wasn’t a big deal that some apps didn’t work with it. Considering that not too many devices even have access to Android 4.4, it’s really not much of an issue at all. » Read the rest

CyanogenMod 11 M1 now available for actively AOSP supported Nexus devices

by Robert Nazarian on
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Cyanogen has already made available the first Milestone release of CyanogenMod 11, which is based on KitKat. It’s only available for Nexus devices, but only the ones that are “actively AOSP supported”, which means the Nexus 5, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 (all variants), and Nexus 10.

This is a new method for the Cyanogen team as they usually release Nightlies at this point, but not allow bug reports. While, M1 will only be available to these select devices, users will be able issue bug reports, although they do feel things are pretty stable at this point.

Other devices such as the Galaxy Nexus and non-Nexus devices will be part of the Nightlies, which should be available in the near future.

source: CyanogenMod / Downloads

Latest Nexus 7 update, JSS15Q, now available on AOSP, additional details emerge

by Jeff Causey on
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Yesterday, an update started rolling out to new Nexus 7 devices to address the multi-touch and GPS issues the new device has been subject to in its first few weeks in the hands of early adopters. Several other Nexus devices also started to receive an OTA update earlier this week to address some security issues. The factory images for all of these updates have now been posted over to AOSP, including the JSS15Q image for the Nexus 7 2013 version.

According to sources, the updates not only address the issues already mentioned, they also took care of some crashing issues involving the devices’ clipboard, tweaked App Opps permissions and some other miscellaneous bits. If you are still running your device on the stock Android install, you can continue to wait for the OTA to hit your device. If you are not afraid to tinker with loading a factory image or your device is rooted and not able to get the OTA update, you may want to head over to the Google Developers site to grab the files.

source: Google Developers
via: Engadget

Android 4.3 for Nexus 10 still isn’t supported in AOSP due to GPU driver issues

by Jared Peters on
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Remember those issues with the Nexus 7 factory images that couldn’t be released because of proprietary graphic drivers? Unfortunately, the Nexus 10 seems to be running into a few of the same problems. The GPU binaries are unable to be released to AOSP which prevents developers from building Android 4.3 from source for the Nexus 10. Factory images are still available, but the source-builds are going to be held up by those GPU drivers and binaries.

Jean-Baptiste Queru confirmed the issues on a Google product forum and stated that only Android 4.2.2 could be built for the Nexus 10 until these drivers were released. Until then, a factory image is your best option if you want to tinker around with what Google has available for their flagship 10 inch tablet.

source: Google Developers

Google Forums

via: Android Police

Nexus 7 tablet experiencing difficulties in getting factory images available for the masses, causing Jean Baptiste-Queru to give up and leave AOSP all together

by Roy Alugbue on
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As excited as we are about the ushering of the new Nexus 7 tablet, there have been some quiet— but major technical snafus for the Android hardcore which has resulted in one of the most important pieces of the AOSP disappearing from the project all together. Tech stud Jean Baptiste-Queru officially confirmed the various rumors regarding his AOSP position and thus, confirmed that he was leaving everything all together because of his frustration with the difficulty of getting factory images for the newest Google tablet. Check out the following for his reasoning:

 

Well, I see that people have figured out why I’m quitting AOSP.

 

There’s no point being the maintainer of an Operating System that can’t boot to the home screen on its flagship device for lack of GPU support, especially when I’m getting the blame for something that I don’t have authority to fix myself and that I had anticipated and escalated more than 6 months ahead.

 

The reasoning is certainly legit, but what’s really eye-opening is the part where he talks about a Google flagship device not being able to boot to the home screen because of the lack of GPU support. Android purists will recall that the Nexus 4— which also features a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip— originally didn’t have the factory image and source code released in full. Naturally the issues were addressed, but owners of the device weren’t able to enjoy the true Nexus experience since the source code/factory images couldn’t be modified. Now we’re going through the same exact issue as the Snapdragon-powered Nexus 7 doesn’t have the factory images available to the masses. Is it a coincidence that both devices that two Snapdragon-based Nexus devices have had factory image issues? Probably— but one thing’s definitely for sure: it’s certainly going to suck not having Jean Baptiste Queru for our AOSP needs. Hopefully the Android team will find some sort of fix or remedy for future Nexus devices.

source: Android and me

HTC may give current One owners a chance at having AOSP too

by Jack Holt on
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Earlier today the rumors that HTC was working on a Google Edition of its current flagship, the HTC One, were put to a rest with an official announcement of the actual device. It looks like HTC isn’t done there though as it also mentioned that the company was looking for a way to bring AOSP software to those early adopters of the device that are wanting the Vanilla flavor. How they’re going to do it is up in the air.

As they put it they are, ”examining the best way to support early adopters of the One.” Could this mean software that gets rid of Sense or could they provide an AOSP ROM to install? All questions that we’re unsure of right now and ones that we’re hoping get answered soon. This should be good news for those of you who bought the device and feel somewhat slighted by today’s announcement. We’ll update you with what HTC decides. Stay tuned.

 

source: The Verge

Sony Xperia Tablet Z receives AOSP support

by Aditya Thawardas on
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Sony opened AOSP software code for the  Sony Xperia Z last month, and now the Xperia Tablet Z has been added to the program as well. This will be the first tablet to receive the AOSP port from Sony. The source code will be available through GitHub, usable after the bootloader on the tablet is unlocked. Keep in mind, this software is not intended for everyday use and several apps and services will not be functional.

You can see a Jelly Bean walkthrough of AOSP on the Tablet Z in action below.

YouTube Preview Image

Source: Sony Blog

Sony Xperia Z released to AOSP

by Jeff Causey on
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Sony announced today that they have opened the software code for their Sony Xperia Z smartphone to the Android Open Source Project. The software has been uploaded to Sony’s GitHub. Between that and information available at Sony’s Developer World site, external developers should have everything they need to get started. The project will be overseen by the same people who were over the Sony Xperia S AOSP. Sony points out that the software is not intended for everyday use and several apps and services one might expect on a standard smartphone are not present. Hit the break for a short video about the project and some shots of what is included in the code. » Read the rest

Roll Your Own Android: Android 4.2.2 Code and Binaries pushing to Android Open Source Project (AOSP)

by Jason Bracey on
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Great news for Nexus users, AOSP is pushing Android Jelly Bean 4.2.2 binaries for several devices in the Nexus product lineup.  The build, JDQ39 (tag: android-4.2.2_r1), is the same as the one currently being rolled out to Nexus devices.

As listed on the Google Developers site, binaries are available for the following devices:

» Read the rest

Google Publishes New Android 4.2.1 Open Source Code To AOSP

by Roy Alugbue on
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It appears that another Jelly Bean build is now on the way folks. Now before you all go thinking this would bring the version at 4.3 or even a 4.2.2— you may want to think again. Google published its Android-4.2.1_r1.1 and Android-4.2.1_r1.2 open source codes  which correspond with the JOP40G and JOP40F Android builds. For now, it appears that the new open source codes bring some very minor bug fixes— but there may be a surprise or two trickled in there somewhere.

You’ll find additional details once you hit the source links.

source: AOSP 1 | AOSP 2