iPhone 5 possibly on the horizon?

IPhone 5

With all of the negativity surrounding the issues plaguing the release of the iPhone 4 and the rise of the Android OS in the worldwide market you have to wonder what is next for Apple.

If you look at the market share around the world of iPhone versus Android for the last 12 months, Apple has been bouncing all over the place with a drop in on their overall share from this same time last year. Android has doubled its market share in just the same 12 months. That shows how the Android platform is giving its users what they want and Apple is not.

From what I have been seeing around the net, the iPhone 4 just does not deliver what the buyers were expecting and a lot of 3GS owners are not happy enough to make the switch. What does that leave Apple to do?

Top everything off with recent release by Apple agreeing to waive the normal 10% restocking fee and now several lawsuits pending for the release of a product not providing what was promised.

In my opinion the most likely course of action is to release a new phone with what was promised in the first place. Could Apple be secretly developing a weapon? Could this device be the next iPhone 5 and Apple once again try to battle for the majority. The iPhone 5 would have to compete with the likes of the HTC EVO and offer their buyers the features and design that they want. Apples best move would be to listen to the public and design something that they want.

We will have to see, but I am sure Apple has something up their sleeves.

» See more articles by Chris Moor


  • Chris

    Hmm, I would be surprised if they did anything other than the same schedule they’ve been following since 2007.

    Other than the incremental improvements, I’m betting the next iPhone (launched in June with an intro even a month or two before) will introduce widgets as a major feature. They will be introduced in a massive marketing campaign, to amazing fanfare. Everyone will rejoice and claim once again that Apple may not have been first, but they just did it right. There will either be an extension to the App Store, or a completely separate widget store. Like multitasking, widgets pose a serious challenge, and Apple will make the same choice they did with multitasking: They will seriously cripple the implementation rather than allow developers to create apps that drain the battery or overtax the processor.

  • http://www.twitter.com/michaelklurfeld Michael

    I highly doubt that we’ll see a differently specced iPhone before WWDC next year. If Apple did release an update, it would be a 4G iPhone on Verizon to coincide with Verizon’s end of 2010/beginning of 2011 LTE launch, but Apple isn’t one to maintain separate devices. I honestly believe that T-Mobile doesn’t have an iPhone solely because AT&T’s GSM network uses the global standard while T-Mobile’s US operation uses its own scheme for bands.

    That said, I am an iPhone 3GS user who wants to make the switch to Android, and to T-Mobile no less. HSPA+ seems way more viable in the next two years than LTE, and on top of that T-Mobile is way cheaper for service. I got the 3GS last summer because Android didn’t have proper hardware at the time. If something like a GSM version of the HTC EVO came to market, even on AT&T (not even AT&T can stop a good ROM from fixing their crippled Android devices), there is no doubt that it will be my next phone.

  • leecasey

    I don’t mean to be rude but this article is ridiculous. I’ve gone from a 3GS to Nexus One as I too was unimpressed with the 4. In particular the virtual multi tasking. Apple will stick to their usual schedule. It takes almost that long to develop a new device anyway.

  • TSC

    “That shows how the Android platform is giving its users what they want and Apple is not.”

    I really want an Android mobile. But I can’t justify it because what I want more is a mobile phone that syncs to my regular podcasts and lectures with minimum fuss.

    My second issue is that because I live in Australia, and the way the phone companies are playing the game, the Android phones aren’t marketed well at all. We don’t have the Nexus One here yet. Almost all the HTC Androids are on an exclusive with Telstra, by far the most exensive company, mostly used by rich old people and businesses.

    Now every side of the argument can, and does, fudge the sales data, taking the stats that promote their side and belittle the opponent. That’s what it means to be biased. But in doing so both sides are, in some sense, assuming their product to be perfect. That might be ok in the short term, but if you want to see the Android robot flying high in 10 years, you have to focus on the areas of improvement. Now I’m guessing you don’t care whether Australians buy Androids. But there would be lot of people that started off buying an iPod, got used to iTunes, started listening to podcasts and iTunes U lectures, upgraded to an iPhone, and happily continued listening. You want them to buy Androids? Do something about it. Or do you want to ignore these people and just tell everyone Android is better?

  • Jim

    “Now every side of the argument can, and does, fudge the sales data, taking the stats that promote their side and belittle the opponent. That’s what it means to be biased.”

    Yep, and you just did that. See below.

    “Android has doubled its market share in just the same 12 months. That shows how the Android platform is giving its users what they want and Apple is not.”

  • TSC

    Jim, your response is incredible. You have perfectly illustrated my point. Thank you.

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