Dashlane wants to kill the password in 2018 with Project Mirror

Dashlane wants to kick off 2018 right by fixing one of the most serious security vulnerabilities that you deal with on a daily basis: your passwords.

This plan beefs up some of Dashlane’s existing features, plus adds a few new things to the service to make sure that you’re digitally protected from weak or compromised passwords.

The first release of Project Mirror, which should be rolling out in Q1 of this year, aims to protect your high-risk accounts. Think of things like PayPal where you frequently link your bank accounts or have other financial or potentially damaging information linked.

To do this, Dashlane is combining its excellent Password Changer feature and its Inbox Scan tech to create Critical Account Protection that will proactively secure any of these high-risk accounts. Essentially, Dashlane will be able to link to your email account, check for any of these high-risk accounts, then update the password to a secure, generated password and save it in your Dashlane locker. This process is entirely automated, so you’ll have to click once and instantly have a much more secure digital footprint.

This may seem like a small step, but the inconvenience of actually changing and updating passwords is a big obstacle for many people, especially if they have a ton of accounts. It can take a lot of time to log in to every single site or service and copy those new passwords back over to another program, so being able to knock it all out within a minute is a huge step forward.

source: Dashlane


About the Author: Jared Peters

Born in southern Alabama, Jared spends his working time selling phones and his spare time writing about them. The Android enthusiasm started with the original Motorola Droid, but the tech enthusiasm currently covers just about everything. He likes PC gaming, Lenovo's Moto Z line, and a good productivity app.


  • https://www.weetechsolution.com Mr. Deepak Khunt

    But at its core, Dashlane is still a password manager.
    Not just that, but this sort of set-it-and-forget it feature means that whoever uses it will literally be at the mercy of Dashlane.