Samsung stops Galaxy Note 7 production worldwide

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Following multiple reports of replacement units exploding throughout the world, Samsung is announcing an indefinite suspension in Galaxy Note 7 production.

An official supplier at Samsung told Yonhap News the following:

“This measure includes a Samsung plant in Vietnam that is responsible for global shipments (of the Galaxy Note 7.”

Consumers safety regulators from the United States, South Korea, and China worked with Samsung to move on the decision.

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Here’s a collection of stories published within the last few days:

These are all awful occurrences, and Samsung is incredibly fortunate that none of its customers and the people around them were seriously harmed. Most of these explosions, which involved replacement devices, went without public acknowledgment by Samsung. Only AT&T was quick to move to consider dropping the phone from its lineup.

Although handled with little immediate transparency, Samsung finally decided to halt production of the Galaxy Note 7.

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If you have a Galaxy Note 7 in your possession, we urge you to return the device to the carrier or retailer you purchased it from. All carriers and retailers that sold the Galaxy Note 7 will be in communication with Samsung on proper steps. Either you’ll be exchanging your Galaxy Note 7 for another device or receive a full refund.

The announcement was made on Sunday night during the second 2016 U.S. presidential debate; therefore, it’s possible Samsung tried sneaking the shock behind a major television event.

Source: Yonhap News
Via: CNBC


About the Author: Justin Herrick

Born and raised in New Jersey, Justin is a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University where he studied marketing with a focus on digital marketing. He's very talkative and enjoys discussing anything from technology and sports to video games and television. As for Justin's current device rotation, he carries around the Google Pixel and Nexus 9. In the rare case that his phone or tablet is not in his hand, he is either flicking through cards on his Moto 360 (2015) or typing away on the Microsoft Surface Book. Justin is patiently waiting for the day that Google replicates the Galaxy Nexus with modern day specifications.