Samsung’s Galaxy S7 gets the official teardown treatment, and it’s not easily fixable

ifixit galaxy s7 teardown

Another phone, another official teardown. This time it’s the Galaxy S7, and unlike some of Samsung’s previous offerings, this one’s not so easy to fix if you bust anything.

The teardown gutted Samsung’s premium device, showing off just how tightly everything is put together. The process removed some pretty interesting things about the device, though, including the “heat pipe” that Samsung touted during the Galaxy S7 reveal. It’s not so much of a liquid heat transferring mechanism as a simple copper pipe, but it does technically redirect heat away from the internals of the phone.

iFixit revealed a few good things and plenty of bad things about fixing the Galaxy S7. On a positive note, most of the components here are modular, so replacing everything is definitely possible. The problem is getting into the phone, and that’s where most of the negatives crop up. Taking the S7 apart is tricky thanks to a ton of adhesive, and the glass front and back of the device make everything extremely prone to cracking. That’s bad news for replacing the battery. The display also has to be removed to replace the USB port, and that more than likely means you’ll break the display in the process.

Overall, iFixit rated the S7 a 3 out of 10 on the repairability scale, with 10 being the easiest and 0 being the toughest. That’s a pretty bad score no matter how you slice it.

Hit the link below to see the teardown step-by-step, if you’re curious about the guts of a Galaxy S7.

source: iFixit


About the Author: Jared Peters

Born in southern Alabama, Jared spends his working time selling phones and his spare time writing about them. The Android enthusiasm started with the original Motorola Droid and an unhealthy obsession with fixing things that aren't broken. This accidentally led to being the go-to guy for anything more complicated than a toaster, which he considers more of a curse than a blessing. Jared is enrolled in online classes at the University of Phoenix, and spends his spare time on video games and listening to music.