Homido’s new VR headset is comfier, supports bigger phones

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VR headset maker Homido has lifted the lid on the newest version of its VR viewer, which offers up new and improved features to improve the user experience.

Homido’s first VR headset (seen above) proved to be a popular choice for Android gamers that wanted a comfortable time exploring the world of mobile VR, but the group says that V2 takes things to the next level.

The smartphone VR company first shared a glimpse of its new headset at CES and is now showing off the product at the VRLA winter expo at the LA Convention Center. Speaking to press, the company has said that ‘quality VR experiences’ can still be found for buyers on a budget, with Homido now aiming to reproduce its European success in the United States.

The latest member of the Homido VR family brings new features to the table such as a more comfortable face plate, a capacitive button similar to that seen on Google Cardboard, image adjustments and a frame that places a user’s smartphone in the optimal position. The new gadget also supports bigger smartphones than its predecessor.

Homido_VR_Headset

Homido co-founder, Raphael Seghier, said:

“When Oculus first made its debut, we realized that most of a VR headset was already in everyone’s pocket. So why make them buy all that equipment again, when all they need are the frame and lenses? Using smartphones for VR just makes sense.”

Late last year, Homido released the Homido Mini, a smaller VR viewer at around $14.99 that could fit in a user’s pocket ‘easier than a pair of car keys’. The original Homido headset dropped in 2014 and currently costs $79.99.

The team over at Homido will be hoping that its new and improved VR headset will convince even more Android smartphone owners to try out VR for themselves. Right now, we’re yet to hear of a release date and price point for the new viewer, but we’ll keep you posted as updates arrive.


About the Author: Tom Morgan

After three years studying at the University of Winchester, Tom graduated with a journalism degree under his belt. A couple of work placements out in the real world at PC Advisor and the BBC taught him that journalism is pretty fun, and a couple of months later he joined the team at Phonecruncher, then signing up with TalkAndroid. Tom would be the first to admit he spends far too much time worrying about Arsenal FC results and watching strange videos on YouTube.


  • Bardo

    “When Oculus first made its debut, we realized that most of a VR headset was already in everyone’s pocket. So why make them buy all that equipment again, when all they need are the frame and lenses?”

    Is the refresh rate high enough and the dot pitch low enough on a mobile phone screen to replace what they’re putting in proprietary VR devices like the Rift?