FOX News, Google come together for next GOP debate

Things are heating up in U.S. politics as November 8, which is Election Day in the country, nears. Both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party are scheduling and hosting debates at a frequent pace because the American people need to learn about the massive field of candidates that are vying to become President of the United States. Actually, the more likely reason is that these debates have been nabbing record-setting television ratings. Millions of people are tuning in whenever Donald Trump takes the center podium during Republican debates and when Martin O’Malley tries to exist next to Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders during Democratic debates. So the parties as well as television networks are gladly taking on debates to get extra buzz.

Television networks, though, aren’t the only ones getting in on the political hype. Facebook and Google have already been partners for numerous debates in 2015 and early 2016. In fact, NBC News partnered with YouTube to stream the most recent Democratic debate online for the world to see. Now, for the upcoming Republican debate in Iowa, Google is stepping up to lend FOX News a hand and provide real-time analytics.


FOX News, which scored the largest non-sports television audience in August for the first Republican debate, will co-host the next debate (scheduled for January 28 at 9:00PM ET in Des Moines) with Google. Viewers will be able to use Google Trends to see which candidates and issues are popular or not during the debate. Then, when the post-debate show begins, Google Trends’ findings will be shared to tell everyone that Donald Trump once again stole the show.

The debate will be moderated by FOX News’ Chris Wallace, Megyn Kelly, and Bret Baier. Select questions used by the trio will come from YouTube personalities, just as was the case with the debate co-hosted by NBC News and YouTube.


Fox News Channel (FNC) announced today that the network will team up with Google to host the upcoming Republican Presidential primary debate held on Thursday, January 28th from 9-11PM/ET in Des Moines, Iowa.

Moderated by Special Report anchor Bret Baier, The Kelly File anchor Megyn Kelly andFOX News Sunday host Chris Wallace, the debate will incorporate real-time Google trends and data to determine questions for the candidates. Additionally, several YouTube stars will have the opportunity to pose questions via submitted videos on topics of importance to them.

On the Google Trends homepage, viewers will have the chance to interact with the debate during the telecast. The page will feature real-time insights on candidate search interest, key issues and topics covered throughout the night. Real-time Google Trends will be showcased during the FOX News post-debate analysis. Leading up to January 28th, Google users will have the opportunity to preview the upcoming debate through various content, including a video and election-related search terms.

FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service dedicated to delivering breaking news as well as political and business news.  A top five cable network, FNC has been the most-watched news channel in the country for 14 years and according to a Suffolk University/USA Today poll, is the most trusted television news source in the country. Owned by 21st Century Fox, FNC is available in more than 90 million homes and dominates the cable news landscape, routinely notching the top ten programs in the genre.

About the Author: Justin Herrick

Born and raised in New Jersey, Justin is a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University where he studied marketing with a focus on digital marketing. He's very talkative and enjoys discussing anything from technology and sports to video games and television. As for Justin's current device rotation, he carries around the LG V20 and Nexus 9. In the rare case that his phone or tablet is not in his hand, he is either flicking through cards on his Moto 360 (2015) or typing away on the Microsoft Surface Book. Justin is patiently waiting for the day that Google replicates the Galaxy Nexus with modern day specifications.