Larry Page, Sergey Brin talk Google’s product approach compared to Apple’s and more

larry_page_sergey_brin_fireside_chat

Google co-founders sat down with venture capitalist Vinod Khosla to talk about a few different topics. One of them was how the company develops new products. While Google and Apple are both giants in the tech industry, they take very different approaches to developing products. Apple chooses to work on a very small number of products at any given time; however, Google typically tries many things and sees what sticks.

Khosla asked how they differ on this subject, and Larry Page had this to say:

I would always have this debate, actually, with Steve Jobs. He’d be like, ‘You guys are doing too much stuff.’ And I’d be like, ‘Yeah that’s true.’ And he was right, in some sense. But I think the answer to that – which I only came to recently, as we were talking about this stuff – is that if you’re doing things that are highly interrelated [...] at some point, they have to get integrated.

Hit the break for more from the fireside chat and the video.

Sergey Bring was also asked something similar. The interviewer brought up Google X, the company’s experimental arm overseen by Brin and he defended the large amount of risk:

From my perspective – running Google X – that’s my job, is to invest in a number of opportunities, each one of which may be a big bet. [...]

If you look at the self-driving cars, for example, I hope that that could really transform transportation around the world [but] it’s got many technical and policy risks. But if you are willing to make a number of bets like that, you’ve got to hope that some of them will pay off.

With Apple launching Healthbook this fall and Google creating Android Wear, the co-founders explained how they also differ in approaches when it comes to the health/fitness category:

Generally, health is just so heavily regulated. It’s just a painful business to be in. It’s just not necessarily how I want to spend my time. Even though we do have some health projects, and we’ll be doing that to a certain extent. But I think the regulatory burden in the U.S. is so high that think it would dissuade a lot of entrepreneurs.

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Source: 9to5Google

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  • BillBasham

    Obviously we need a regulation to force companies to ignore regulations when deciding where to invest their resources.