Hands On With Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Digital Pen

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As if your life wasn’t digital enough with tablets, smartphones, smartwatches, digital credit cards, pedometers, car starters etc, Qualcomm wants to corner another small market in the industry, which of late, appears to be Samsung’s turf. At CES 2014 the company has put  on display their new Snapdragon Digital Pen for those not wanting to give up their pad and paper. We first saw this a few days ago however, our own Editor in Chief Rob Nazarian was on site to get a hands-on demo personally from Qualcomm. It’s easy writing on paper but what’s difficult is organizing those notes and then finding them later once you’re done.

Now you can have your cake and eat it. The pen uses high frequency ultrasound waves using at least five built in speakers as part of the new Snapdragon 805 CPU. With it, you can write on any flat surface such as a pad or notebook and all will be instantly transcribed on the tablet for safe keeping. In addition, Qualcomm also hinted at the fact they’re working on a second prototype that’s a little smaller and could be integrated with future devices. As of now, the device will be sold separately. Check out the hands on video below and don’t forget to head here for the rest of our CES 2014 coverage.   


About the Author: Joe Sirianni

Joe was born in New Jersey and spent most of his childhood moving around from state to state. He eventually made his way to Pennsylvania where he met his Portuguese beauty and made her his wife. He now has three great kids and full access to all of the Portuguese food he can eat. Joe's love for mobile technology began when he bought his first Palm Pilot, a Palm M130 and left it on top of his car, driving off, causing it to smash into a thousand pieces. Forced to buy a new device, he quickly discovered that specs were changing so rapidly he was buying a new device every six months just to keep up. Since then, he has constantly felt the need to have the latest and greatest. When the "smartphone" revolution began and integrating cell phones and PDA's was the norm, he quickly jumped to Windows Mobile for several years until the first Android device was launched, the T-Mobile G1. Joe began appreciating all of the free utilities Google provided and sold his soul (his precious data) to Google long before they got into the mobile OS business. So, there was no hesitation at all for him to jump on board and ride the Android train as an early adopter. And boy has it been a blast. Joe now works in the Engineering & Operations dept for a major mobile carrier where he remotely troubleshoots cell sites and loves being an Editor for TalkAndroid.


  • phor11

    Could I not just write on the notepad with a regular pen and take a pic of it to get it on the tablet without having to buy a special pen?