GameBench hopes to measure up with new benchmarking software for Android devices

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After some recent incidents in which Samsung was found to have engineered their devices to perform in an exceptionally strong manner when being measured for benchmark tests with common tools, some folks have been searching for a way to minimize what they see as “cheating” by smartphone manufacturers. One of those searching for a better way is a startup company called GameBench. They claim to have created a test that focuses on gaming capabilities, primarily screen performance and battery drain, that cannot be tricked because it uses actual game titles for the testing. The app is still in beta with a projected release date sometime during the first quarter of 2014. However, GameBench has already put the Samsung Galaxy S 4 and the HTC One through the paces.

The GameBench app runs in the background on a smartphone and takes measurements during system actual system use while games are played. The app measures frame rates and battery drain. GameBench runs popular games from Google Play while collecting the data, then uses an algorithm to weight the data on the way to producing a single number for a final score.

While GameBench works to get the app ready for an official release, they did provide some scores that were generated during their testing phase for the Galaxy S 4 and the HTC One. According to other benchmarking sites, these two devices score nearly identical, which is not surprising given the hardware similarity between the devices. In the GameBench testing. the Galaxy S 4 was able to achieve higher frame rates on a consistent basis, but that came at a penalty as the HTC One showed a much later battery drain rate. Once the numbers were crunched, the final score showed the Samsung unit far ahead.

Look for more GameBench results on a wider variety of hardware to be coming out as the company continues their own testing and certainly once the final version of the app is released. As their database is filled, we should be able to get a better picture of how different devices measure up against each other.

source: Engadget

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